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Virtual

Title: The Role of Trauma in Predicting Motives for Cannabis Use and Problematic Cannabis Use In Adolescent and Emerging Adult Medical Cannabis Patients and Non-Patient Cannabis Users

Trainer: Whitney Brammer, PhD

Number of CEs: 1.0 CE

Presentation Summary: Despite evidence of the contribution of childhood trauma to the development of problematic cannabis use, its mediating pathways are largely unknown. Given the relations between cannabis motives with trauma and problematic cannabis use, motives of use may represent one construct through which trauma impacts the development of impairing cannabis use. This Stress, Trauma, and Resilience (STAR) Seminar will review results from several projects derived from a prospective longitudinal sample of 339 medical cannabis and non-patient young adult users from the Los Angeles area. These studies sought to examine the impact of childhood trauma subtypes on multiple indicators of problematic use in adolescence and emerging adulthood through a range of cannabis use motives (e.g., emotional coping, managing attention, pain, and sleep, etc.). Results indicate that coping and health-related motives reflect potential intervenable factors that predict problematic cannabis use in emerging adulthood among young adult cannabis users with histories of childhood trauma. Results highlight the importance of and value for assessing a wide range of motives and cannabis use outcomes to target and address areas for intervention. Learning Objectives: 1. Summarize research on the intersection of trauma, motives for cannabis use, and problematic cannabis use. 2. Describe longitudinal pathways toward different forms of problematic cannabis use across adolescence and emerging adulthood. 3. Recognize differences between different motives for cannabis use in predicting outcomes of cannabis use.

Learning Objectives:
   

  1. Summarize research on the intersection of trauma, motives for cannabis use, andproblematic cannabis use.
  2. Describe longitudinal pathways toward different forms of problematic cannabis use across adolescence and emerging adulthood.
  3. Recognize differences between different motives for cannabis use in predicting outcomes of cannabis use.