Medical Student Manual 

Policies and procedures that will guide you through the MD program at DGSOM.

This online Medical Student Handbook includes current academic policies and standards that govern students in the MD program at the David Geffen School of Medicine (DGSOM) at UCLA. In addition, students participating in DGSOM’s MD program are subject to policies and standards established by the University of California, UCLA, the UCLA Office of the Registrar, and the UCLA Office of the Dean of Students. School policies are subject to change. Students are expected to familiarize themselves with these policies, requirements, and any modifications that may impact their programs.

Graduation Requirements, Program Competencies, & Program Objectives

Graduation Requirements

1. Passing All Coursework

Students must maintain a satisfactory level of performance in DGSOM coursework.

2. Annual recommendation for promotion by the Committee on Academic Standing, Progress & Promotion (CASPP)

3. Passing National Board Examinations

Students must take and pass USMLE Step 1 and USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK) 

4. Completion Time

Students must successfully complete the designated four-year program of medical education. DGSOM does not offer a formal extended program. Recognizing that some students may need additional time, students may take no longer than six years to complete the program. Approved medical and academic leaves of absence are not counted toward the six-year limit.

5. Recommendation of Degree

Upon successful completion of the curriculum of DGSOM, the student is recommended to the FEC for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. The final approval for graduation is made by the FEC and the Vice Dean for Education of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

PRIME-LA

PRIME-LA is a concurrent/dual degree program with a special emphasis on leadership and advocacy to address healthcare disparities in medically underserved populations in California (and the US). Students in PRIME-LA begin their medical school experience by participating in a Leadership and Advocacy Summer Foundations Program that sets the direction for the program and establishes early group bonding while learning about leadership and advocacy.

During the first two years, PRIME-LA students complete the regular DGSOM core curriculum. Students also participate in special selective courses during the first and second years. In the summer between the first and second years, students focus on a project/research related to health disparities and problems with access to care within underserved populations and present their project/research at the DGSOM Josiah Brown Poster Day held at the end of the summer.

In the third year, students participate in the same clinical clerkships as all other medical students at DGSOM and may request clerkship sites in clinical arenas that particularly address underserved and disadvantaged populations.

During the fourth year, students will complete an advanced degree that designs and implements a project related to improving health for the underserved. Advanced degree options include MBA, MPH, MPP, and MS.

The fifth-year will be within the DGSOM Colleges. The “Colleges” further prepare students for residencies and future roles as leaders. College activities include seminars, special and specific electives, a research project, and an intense advising and mentoring program. Sub-internship opportunities to enhance career goals are stressed. Seniors present their leadership projects as part of the DGSOM Senior Scholarship Day.

PRIME-LA

UCLA-Caltech Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP)

Students complete their medical training at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and their PhD in one of many graduate training programs at UCLA or the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

MSTP Program

Concurrent Degree Programs

DGSOM students who are in good academic/professional standing and have successfully completed their required core clerkships may pursue the Master of Business Administration, Public Policy, or Public Health as part of the UCLA concurrent degree programs. 

The MBA, MPP, and MPH programs at UCLA are typically two years. However, the concurrent degree programs allow completion of the master’s degree concurrently with the MD degree, with only one additional year of enrollment. Students spend one-year full-time on coursework for the master’s degree and then complete the requirements of their program during the MS4 year back in medical school. The master’s degree and MD degree are both awarded at the end of the MS4 year.

Program Competencies & Program Objectives

What we aspire our graduates to be:

A COURAGEOUS physician welcomes uncertainty as a space for discovery, questions and challenges the world around them, and is unafraid to do what is difficult. They consistently seek out areas for growth, and are advocates for their patients, profession, science, and society. 

A CURIOUS physician always has the desire to ask “Why”. They are internally motivated to challenge assumptions, ask questions, seek creative answers, and to continuously improve knowledge, skills, and attitudes. 

A DEDICATED physician has the passion to persevere towards long-term goals, is motivated by a strong sense of purpose and ownership, and embraces lifelong learning. 

An ETHICAL physician is honest, altruistic, and patient-centered. They are motivated by duty, integrity, social justice, and concern for the common good. 

A HUMBLE physician recognizes the honor of practicing medicine, helping others, and contributing to scientific knowledge. They accept the limits of their own knowledge and abilities, are willing to grow and change their own perspective, and are open to learning from others.

A HUMANISTIC physician values and strives to treat everyone with kindness, genuine compassion, empathy, and respect for their diverse background and values.

A REFLECTIVE physician is mindful, conscientious and adaptable. They are continuously examining themselves and their environment to improve medicine and health.

A RESILIENT physician purposefully works to strengthen their ability to cope with stress and challenging situations in healthy and productive ways, knows when to seek additional help, and has the resolve to grow in the face of adversity.

Patient Care

Provide patient-centered care that is compassionate, humanistic, appropriate, and effective for the treatment of health problems and the promotion of health.

  • Gather and interpret pertinent data about patients and their conditions by taking focused and comprehensive histories and physical examinations, and by reviewing results of diagnostic tests.
  • Formulate appropriate differential diagnoses based on the clinical data that has been gathered.
  • Develop comprehensive patient care plans based on scientific evidence and patient preferences.
  • Perform basic procedural skills with proficiency.

Medical Knowledge

Demonstrate a strong foundation of medical knowledge plus an ability to acquire new concepts and apply them to the care of patients.

  • Gather relevant biomedical information and assess its applicability to the care of diverse patient populations.
  • Demonstrate skill in physical diagnosis and clinical reasoning in the treatment of common diseases and conditions.
  • Integrate biomedical, clinical, social and behavioral sciences into the care of individuals and populations.

Interpersonal Communication Skills

Demonstrate skills to exchange information effectively and work collaboratively with patients, patients’ families, and professional colleagues.

  • Organize patient information and communicate it efficiently through presentations to other healthcare providers, adapting content to clinical settings.
  • Give and receive patient handoffs in an organized fashion during transitions in patient care.
  • Convey relevant information effectively to patients and patients’ family members from diverse social and cultural backgrounds.
  • Communicate successfully with colleagues from multiple disciplines, including healthcare professionals and trainees, while caring for patients.
  • Maintain accurate and timely medical records, including the resolution of conflicting or incorrect information, to promote patient care.

Ethics, Professionalism, AND Professional Identity

Demonstrate adherence to the highest standards of professional responsibility and sensitivity to the diverse needs of patients, their families, and society.

  • Demonstrate a commitment to serving patients and society with empathy, compassion, kindness and deep respect for diverse backgrounds and values.
  • Show a commitment to improving human health, alleviating suffering and delivering acts of kindness.
  • Demonstrate humility in all interactions during the practice of medicine and advancement of scientific knowledge, accepting the limits of one’s own knowledge and abilities while embracing opportunities to learn from others.
  • Act with honor, honesty, and altruism in all professional interactions while being guided by duty, integrity, social justice, and a concern for the common good.
  • Show a capacity to persevere towards long-term goals, motivated by a strong sense of purpose and a desire to embrace life-long learning.
  • Demonstrate responsibility and accountability to patients, society, and the profession.
  • Demonstrate a commitment to ethical principles pertaining to the provision or withholding of care, confidentiality, informed consent, conflict of interest, and business practices, including compliance with relevant laws, policies, and regulations.

Practice-based Learning AND Improvement

Demonstrate honest self-reflection and the ability to appraise and assimilate scientific evidence in a continuous effort to improve clinical practice.

  • Demonstrate self-directed learning to identify and redress gaps in knowledge and practice.
  • Show an ability to appraise scientific and clinical data and incorporate these into patient care.
  • Be receptive and responsive to feedback while also providing constructive, professional feedback to others.

System-based Practice

Demonstrate awareness of, and responsiveness to, the context of health care systems, including an ability to effectively call on system resources to provide optimal care.

  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of healthcare systems, including how patients interact with healthcare providers in hospitals and clinics and medical insurance administrators.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of safety-net providers and their role in patient care.
  • Be able to identify, evaluate and address instances of inefficient or low-quality care.

Leadership And Inter-Professional Teamwork

Demonstrate an ability to work as part of an interprofessional team to optimize safe and effective patient care.

  • Engage effectively with other health professionals to establish and maintain an environment of mutual respect, dignity, diversity, ethical integrity, and trust.
  • Be able to address health care needs through the practice of patient- and population-
  • centered care that is safe, timely, efficient, effective, and equitable.
  • Demonstrate leadership skills that enhance scientific learning and/or health care delivery locally, nationally, and globally.

Curiosity, Inquiry, And Critical Thinking

Demonstrate an ability to apply analytical thinking, discerning inquiry, and creative problem-solving to identify and fill gaps in scientific and clinical evidence-based knowledge that impacts patient care.

  • Demonstrate clinical reasoning to develop sound and effective strategies for patient care.
  • Demonstrate the application of advances in biomedical science to knowledge gaps in clinical practice.
  • Engage in scholarly inquiry to advance medical and scientific knowledge.
  • Recognize that ambiguity is a part of scientific discovery and clinical health care, and show an ability to weigh uncertainty when making decisions.

Social Justice And Advocacy

Demonstrate awareness and understanding of social justice issues in health care while always maintaining a patient-centered mindset to advocate at all levels on behalf of patients.

  • Articulate the role of the physician in promoting health and well-being for diverse patients and populations.
  • Articulate the nature and causes of health disparities, both locally and globally.
  • Explain the relationship between social determinants of health and the incidence of illness among individuals and underserved communities.
  • Demonstrate advocacy for patients, communities, and society to address and reduce health disparities.

PATIENT CARE that is compassionate, appropriate, and effective for the treatment of health problems and the promotion of health.

  • Conduct patient-centered encounters that balance the needs of the patient with time constraints of practice. 
    • ascertaining the patient’s goals for the encounter,
    • appreciating the patient’s experience of illness,
    • performing a focused physical examination, and
    • negotiating diagnostic and management priorities.
  • Accurately perform and document both complete and focused histories and physical examinations that are based on the pathophysiology of presenting complaints, and that address relevant psychosocial and family issues.
  • Prioritize patients’ problems, formulate appropriate differential diagnoses, and develop appropriate plans for diagnosis and/or management.
  • Perform the following basic diagnostic and therapeutic procedures
    • Basic first aid
    • Basic Life Support (BLS Certification)
    • Suturing simple lacerations
    • Drawing venous blood
    • Starting an IV
    • Basic airway management
  • Be familiar with the technique for normal vaginal delivery.
  • Be able to discuss the principles of and the relative advantages and disadvantages of various therapeutic modalities, including surgery, pharmacology, physical rehabilitation, mental health care, behavioral modification, and complementary and alternative medicine, as applied to common clinical situations.
  • Use epidemiological principles and data to formulate measures for the care of individuals and communities and be able to read the medical literature.
  • Evaluate the roles that unemployment, poverty, and lack of education play as obstacles to quality health care.
  • Develop and implement individualized risk reduction plans based on a culturally-sensitive assessment of important medical and social conditions, including sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, and interpersonal violence.

MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE about established and evolving biomedical, clinical, and cognate (e.g.,epidemiological and social-behavioral) sciences and the application of this knowledge to patient care.

  • Know the scientific principles that underlie the current understanding of normal human development, function, and disease. Be able to accurately express and use these principles in discussing health maintenance, common disease processes, and disease evaluation and management.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of social and behavioral factors that influence patients’ responses to health and disease. Such factors include:
    • specific cultural, ethnic and societal beliefs and behaviors,
    • patients’ age, education, finances, and family resources,
    • alternative or complementary medical practices within patients’ communities
  • Understand the scientific basis and interpretation of common diagnostic modalities, including: imaging, electrocardiograms, blood and urine tests, pathologic studies, and functional assessment tests. Discuss the indications, contraindications and costeffectiveness of common diagnostic studies.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of common problems and diseases for diverse populations
    • Common problems
      • Abdominal pain
      • Anxiety
      • Change in mental status
      • Chest pain
      • Chronic pain
      • Cough
      • Diarrhea
      • Headache
      • Obesity
      • Trauma
      • Heartburn
      • Low back pain
      • Shortness of breath
      • Substance abuse
      • Pharyngitis
    • Diseases
      • Alcoholism
      • Arthritis
      • Asthma
      • Cancer
      • Dementia
      • Depression
      • Diabetes
      • Osteoporosis
      • HIV
      • Hypertension
      • Hyperlipidemia
      • Otitis Media
      • Pneumonia
      • Psychosis
      • TB
      • UTI
      • Upper respiratory infection
      • Vaginitis
    • Conditions
      • Pregnancy
      • Menopause
      • Domestic violence
      • End-of-life issues
  • Understand basic issues for promoting health and preventing disease, including nutrition, exercise, psychological health, preventive pharmacology, genetic predisposition to disease, sanitation, environmental and workplace hazards, lifestyles, and immunizations, and apply this understanding to patient management.
  • Assess the health status, demographics, and socioeconomic characteristics of medically underserved populations.
  • Recognize differences in belief systems, values, languages, religions, and health practices that impact the medical care of culturally diverse and medically underserved populations.
  • Know when and how to report incidents of domestic violence including child, elder, and spousal abuse.

PRACTICE-BASED LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT that involves investigation and evaluation of their own patient care, appraisal and assimilation of scientific evidence, and improvements in patient care.

  • Understand the importance of life-long learning to adequately care for patients, participate in patient education, and pursue creative scholarly endeavors.
  • Use PubMed and other relevant databases, to acquire new information and resources for learning.
  • Identify and use reliable, authoritative sources of medical information.
  • Organize personal resources efficiently and systematically using electronic tools and other methods.
  • Describe and assess common scientific methodologies used in clinically-relevant medical research.
  • Identify the evidential value, organization, and logistics of various types of clinical trials, and be able to advise patients concerning their participation in or interpretation of these.
  • Read, summarize and critique research and disease review articles in peer-reviewed journals such as New England Journal of Medicine.
  • Use evidence-based approaches as tools to decide whether to accept new findings, therapies, and technologies for incorporation into medical practice.
  • Utilize decision-support systems and guidelines for clinical decision-making, including an understanding of the roles of preferences and probabilities.
  • Understand and use continuous quality improvement practices.
  • Translate questions that arise from daily clinical practice into formal research hypotheses.
  • Utilize computer technology to aid in the design, writing, analysis, and presentation of data from a clinical research project (this competency is currently unique to the Drew program).
  • Design, implement, and complete a clinical research project that will meet the criteria for a Thesis (this competency is currently unique to the Drew program).

INTERPERSONAL AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS that result in effective information exchange and teaming with patients, their families, and other health professionals.

  • Demonstrate interpersonal skills that build rapport and empathic communication with patients and their families across socioeconomic, racial, and cultural boundaries.
  • Make both complete and focused case presentations that are accurate and well-organized; prepare and maintain complete, accurate, well-organized medical records.
  • Demonstrate a commitment to and skill in teaching medical students, colleagues, and other members of the allied health profession using the concepts and vocabulary of contemporary basic and clinical science.
  • Function as a productive member of a team.
  • Work collaboratively with health professionals from other disciplines.
  • Skillfully address sensitive issues in an effective, compassionate, non-judgmental manner. 
    • screening for alcohol and drug abuse, domestic violence, and sexual activities
    • screening for cancer risks
    • giving “bad news”
  • Describe and use sound principles for changing patients’ behavior in order to promote and improve their health.
  • Inform patients and their families about health and illness in a way that is culturally-sensitive, jargonfree and appropriate to their needs, including counseling on prevention and psychosocial issues.
  • Obtain informed consent from patients by clearly explaining the risks, benefits, and alternatives for common medical and surgical procedures in a culturally sensitive manner.

PROFESSIONALISM, as manifested through a commitment to carrying out professional responsibilities, adherence to ethical principles, and sensitivity to a diverse patient population.

  • Demonstrate reliability, dependability, and integrity in interactions with colleagues and patients.
  • Deal with professional mistakes openly and honestly in ways that promote patient trust and self-learning.
  • Accurately assess one’s personal strengths and limitations, relevant to one’s practice of medicine and continued learning.
  • Develop abilities to receive and provide constructive feedback as part of peer and self-assessment of professional behaviors.
  • Understand appropriate coping mechanisms for dealing with stress, intellectual uncertainty, interpersonal conflict, and issues related to power.
  • Use basic ethical concepts and approaches to identify and analyze the ethical dimensions of common situations in medical practice, health policy, and research.
  • Understand the obligation to treat the individual patient, and discuss the conflicts between caring for a patient and caring for a population.
  • Recognize an obligation to the health of society, locally, regionally, and nationally.
  • Demonstrate the ability to provide leadership to groups of colleagues or patients.

SYSTEM-BASED PRACTICE, as manifested by actions that demonstrate an awareness of and responsiveness to the larger context and system of health care, and the ability to effectively call on system resources to provide care that is of optimal value.

  • Know the structure and functions of the health care delivery and insurance systems currently in place in California and the United States. Compare and contrast these to alternative systems used in other industrialized countries.
  • Describe major current health system reform initiatives, including possible benefits and barriers to achieving them.
  • Discuss the concept of a medical safety net and strategies for lowering access barriers for vulnerable populations.
  • Define an integrated delivery system, list its key components and describe how they function together to deliver optimal patient care and outcomes.
  • Discuss applications of health information technologies including electronic health records, patient registries, and computerized order entry and prescribing.
  • Understand and explain the concept of value in health care, and provide examples of methods physicians use to improve value, including comparative effectiveness research, evidence-based guidelines and quality improvement.
  • Compare current and emerging physician reimbursement methodologies, and discuss their likely impacts on utilization, costs, quality, access, and provider incomes.
  • Distinguish the roles of primary care providers and specialists, and discuss the options communities have to achieve an appropriate balance between primary and specialty care.
  • Understand the flow of funds through the U.S. health care system, from their points of origin through public (Medicare and Medicaid) and private (insurance companies and health plans) intermediaries, down to the provider tier (physicians and hospitals). Distinguish between costs and charges.
  • Identify and use resources and ancillary health care services for patients in situations in which social and economic barriers to access exist.
  • Articulate the physician’s special responsibilities toward both individual patients and society at large, and discuss ways to balance these competing needs and priorities.

Curricular Policies

Academic Standing

The chairs of the Years 1, 2, and 3 Academic Performance Committees (APC), the DGSOM Registrar, and/or Associate Dean for Student Affairs are responsible for notifying the Committee on Academic Standing, Progress, and Promotion (CASPP) of all circumstances which warrant consideration of a formal change in student academic/professional standing. CASPP shall review all questions of student formal academic/professional standing on a monthly basis, and will make all final determinations regarding changes in academic/professional standing.

Categories of Academic/Professional standing in the David Geffen School of Medicine are:

Good Academic/Professional Standing

  • Successfully passed all courses or clerkships with no notices of poor course or clerkship related performance.
  • Satisfactory clerkship or course evaluations with no notations of unprofessional conduct and no Professionalism Concern Reporting Forms.
  • Uphold and adhere to the DGSOM UCLA Honor Code, Technical Standards, University policies, and UCLA Student Conduct Code.

Experiencing Academic/Professional Difficulty

The Experiencing Academic/Professional Difficulty designation is informal and removed by CASPP after the failed course, clerkship, USMLE exam, and/or professionalism issue is addressed and remediated. Individuals designated in this category are strongly advised to seek resources available to students. Students will receive this designation if any of the following occur:

  • One course or clerkship failure, OR
  • Two course or clerkship failures in one academic year, OR
  • One or more notices of poor course or clerkship-related performance, OR
  • A grade of marginal performance in two or more courses in one academic year, OR
  • A rating of "2 - Marginal Performance" in the Professional Attitudes and Behaviors section of the clinical clerkship evaluation from two clerkships, OR
  • One failure of USMLE (Step 1, 2CK, 2CS) exam, OR
  • Failure to meet USMLE policy, OR
  • A cumulative of two (2) Professionalism Concern Reporting Forms, OR
  • A violation of the DGSOM UCLA Honor Code, UCLA Student Conduct Code, OR
  • Professional conduct deemed by CASPP and/or Associate Dean for Student Affairs to warrant this designation

Academic/Professional Probation

Academic/Professional Probation is a formal designation and is recorded on the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE). If placed on probation, the student will have 12 months to improve academic/professional standing. Failure to improve academic/professional standing by the end of the 12-month period will result in a recommendation for dismissal. Students will receive this designation if any of the following occur:

  • Three course or clerkship failures in one academic year, OR
  • Failure of retest exam, OR
  • Two or more violations of the DGSOM UCLA Honor Code, UCLA Student Conduct Code, OR
  • Professional conduct deemed by CASPP and/or Associate Dean of Student Affairs to warrant this designation, OR
  • A cumulative of Three (3) Professionalism Concern Reporting Forms

Dismissal from the David Geffen School of Medicine

Students are recommended for dismissal if any of the following occur:

  • Four course or clerkship failures in one academic year
  • Failure to meet terms of remediation for a failed course or clerkship
  • Failure to meet United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) policy
  • Violation of the DGSOM UCLA Honor Code or UCLA Student Conduct Code, and/or unprofessional conduct deemed by CASPP to be severe and egregious in nature
  • Failure to successfully complete the M.D. program within the 6-year time-to-degree requirement

The appeals process is as follows:

  • Requests to reconsider actions taken by the identified APC that affect the academic status of a student, including but not limited to requirements to correct deficiencies, suspension, and plans for remediation, must be submitted in writing to CASPP within 30 days of receipt of the action.
  • An appeal must cite the basis of the reconsideration and provide sufficient and detailed information to support the appeal. Disagreement with the determination of the identified APC is not sufficient cause to request an appeal. New evidence may not be presented in the appeals process unless the student can prove that it was unavailable during the identified APC deliberations.
  • If the student failed to disclose information or facts that were in their possession at the time of the meeting with the identified APC, the student is considered to have waived the right to raise those facts or information on reconsideration or appeal.
  • During the appeals process, CASPP will not reconsider the facts and statements on which the original decision was based but will only consider:
    • Whether new information that was unavailable during the identified APC deliberations has been discovered
    • Whether there is any evidence of discrimination that impacted the student's ability to participate in any academic, research, or other University service, program, or activity as determined by the appropriate Institutional Office
    • Whether there is any evidence of a procedural error in the identified Academic Performance Committee's review that prejudiced the student’s ability to receive a fair hearing
    • Whether there is any evidence that the identified APC acted in an arbitrary or capricious manner.
  • CASPP may affirm or reject the identified Academic Performance Committee's determination, or refer the matter back to the identified Academic Performance Committee for further consideration.
  • If a request for appeal is denied by CASPP, the decision may be appealed to the Vice Dean for Education within 10 working days from the student’s notification of CASPP’s final decision.
  • CASPP decisions may be appealed solely on the basis of whether CASPP followed appropriate procedures in reaching its conclusions and formulating actions.  If the Vice Dean for Education concludes that CASPP did not follow appropriate procedures, he or she will remand the matter to CASPP for reconsideration.  The decision of the Vice Dean for Education is final in all matters involving fulfillment of academic, professionalism, or technical standards, and related remediation plans.
  • If the Vice Dean for Education upholds a recommendation of CASPP to dismiss a student from DGSOM, this decision may be appealed to the Faculty Executive Committee (FEC) within 10 working days from the student’s notification.  The FEC will not reconsider the facts and statements on which the original decision was based.  Appeals to the FEC may be filed solely on the basis of: 
    • Whether there is any evidence of discrimination that impacted the student's ability to participate in any academic, research, or other University service, program, or activity as determined by the appropriate Institutional Office
    • Whether there is any evidence of a procedural error in CASPP's review that prejudiced the student’s ability to receive a fair hearing
    • Whether there is any evidence that CASPP acted in an arbitrary or capricious manner

Attendance

  1. Purpose

    • To establish attendance policies for various learning activities 

    • To provide processes for requesting and receiving excused absences 

    • To provide processes in the case of unexcused absences or habitual tardiness 

  2. Definitions

    • (2.1) Excused Absence
      • Absence where the student has previously submitted and received approval via the procedures described herein. 
    • (2.2) Unexcused Absence 
      • Absence from any required learning activity without prior approval, including leaving a required session early or arriving significantly late. 
    • (2.3) Significant Habitual Tardiness 
      • Arrival to a required learning activity past the scheduled start time for multiple required sessions in a course. 

Updated by DGSOM Dean's Office September 2023

  1. The Importance of Attendance

    • Full engagement for mandatory activities, including attendance, is a core principle promoting the professional development of health care professions and is in line with the expectations for students as they mature into fully functioning, independent health care providers. Being present and engaged in faculty-led educational sessions:

      • Positively impacts personal learning (i.e., one’s ability to learn from peers, faculty, and staff). 

      • Strengthens team dynamics (e.g., group participation and interactions) and the learning environment for all. 

      • Encourages faculty engagement with the learning environment.  

      • Fosters the development of sound work ethic and habits expected of physicians. In accordance with this philosophy, all students are expected to adhere to the following policies.  

The DGSOM Learning Environment is based upon the interactive engagement of students and faculty who have a shared interest in promoting a respectful and collaborative learning environment. Professional behavior is demonstrated through attendance, preparedness, and respectful participation in learning events. 
 
The Curricular Affairs Office (CAO) records and reviews all absences. 

  1. Excused Absences

    • (1a) In the event you need to report an absence of an urgent nature, email the Curricular Affairs Office at CA@mednet.ucla.edu. All absences will require submission of an Absence Request Form. For students with an emergency, the Absence Request Form should be submitted as soon as this is feasible in the setting of the underlying circumstances. Acceptable reasons for excused absences encompass the following scenarios: 
      1. Illness affecting one's ability to report to the scheduled session. Please note that if a student is absent for three or more consecutive days, the student must submit a note from a healthcare provider or the Clearance to Return to the Curriculum Form (PDF) to the Student Affairs Office (dgsomsao@mednet.ucla.edu) attesting to the student’s ability to resume participation in the curriculum.  
      2. Students seeking health care for which health care appointments cannot be rescheduled
      3. Personal Emergency (for example, illness of a loved one or loss of a loved one). Please note that it is the student’s responsibility to also notify their Society Dean for absences related to a personal emergency. 
      4. Professional Activities. Requests for an absence to attend professional meetings will be considered for approval if a student is presenting their research or is serving as a delegate representing DGSOM at UCLA. The request should be made as soon as the student is aware of the need to attend the professional meeting and at least 30 business days prior to the meeting.
      5. Jury Duty. For information regarding Jury Duty, please visit the Registrar page. 
  2. Religious Observances

    • Faculty and staff are committed to supporting diversity at DGSOM. Religious holidays are excused absences and students are required to submit a form to the Curricular Affairs Office to document their absence. Students may be required to make up missed time. 
  3. Unexcused Absences

    • (3a) Unexcused absences are considered unprofessional behavior and will result in issuance of a Professionalism Concern Report (PCR)(see PCR policy).  

      1. (3a.1) Consequences for unexcused absences or repeated episodes of significant tardiness may include changes in student academic standing by the Academic Performance Committee (APC)  

      2. (3a.2) Demonstration of poor professionalism, such as habitual unexcused absences and/or habitual tardiness, may also be reflected in the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE), per recommendations by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). 

      3. (3a.3) Misrepresentation or dishonesty about information in absence notification forms or attendance sign-in is considered a violation of the UCLA student professional code of conduct and will result in a professionalism concern report (PCR). 

    • (3d) If a student does not notify the Curricular Affairs Office or their team, the Dean’s Office may reach out to their emergency contact to check on the students’ well-being. 

    • (3e) For any absence, the Course Chair(s) and/or Course Coordinator will determine how missed coursework can be remediated to fulfill course requirements. Students are responsible for material they miss due to an excused absence.  

    • (3f) Missed required sessions will not be rescheduled or reoffered, though they may be remediated. Students are responsible for submitting all assignments on the original due date, except in cases of emergency or extenuating circumstances. 

    • (3g) Students missing optional educational activities are responsible for their own remediation of missed material. Faculty are not required to provide compensatory educational experiences. 

    • (3h) If a student has or anticipates circumstances necessitating unique, unusual, or excessive requests for time away, they should speak with an Assistant and/or Associate Dean for Student Affairs as soon as possible after becoming aware of the circumstance and prior to the course(s) which will be affected by time away. 

  4. Procedures

    • (4a) All absence forms are found in the Helpful Links dashboard on Gryphon and on the DGSOM Handbook webpage; they include submission and approval or acknowledgement of the absence. All absences will require submission of an Absence Request Form. For students with an emergency, the Absence Request Form should be submitted as soon as this is feasible in the setting of the underlying circumstances.

Updated by DGSOM Dean's Office September 2023

  1. Attendance Policy for Basecamp

    • (1a) All learning activities for Basecamp are designated as required. See students’ course calendars or communication from course chairs or course coordinators for more details for each session.  
    • (1b) Attendance will be recorded for all required learning activities during Basecamp. 
    • (1c) For any absence, the Course Chair(s) or Course Coordinator will determine how missed coursework can be remediated to fulfill course requirements. Students are responsible for material they miss due to an excused absence.  
    • (1d) If a student needs to miss a required session for any reason, the student must contact the Curricular Affairs Office at CA@mednet.ucla.edu before the session begins.
    • (1e) Students must notify the Curricular Affairs Office if they anticipate the rare event of arriving late and/or leaving a session early. 
    • (1f) In the event a student needs to report an absence of an urgent nature, email the Curricular Affairs Office at CA@mednet.ucla.edu. All absences will require submission of an Absence Request Form. For students with an emergency, the Absence Request Form should be submitted as soon as this is feasible in the setting of the underlying circumstances. 
  2. Basecamp Absence Policy  

    • (2a) Unexcused Absences  
      1. (2a.1) Unexcused absence(s) during the course will result in an Unexcused Absence Notification. 
      2. (2a.2) Additional unexcused absences will result in the issuance of a Professionalism Concern Report (PCR). 
      3. (2a.3) Failure to notify the Curricular Affairs Office (ca@mednet.ucla.edu) in advance of the missed session will result in an unexcused absence.  
      4. (2a.4) Forgetting to sign-in to a required session will result in a warning. Forgetting to sign-in multiple times will result in a PCR. 
      5. (2a.5) Students who arrive late and/or students who leave the required session early who do not inform the Curricular Affairs Office beforehand will receive an Unexcused Absence Notification. 
  3. Basecamp Procedures

    • (3a) Excused Absence Request for Basecamp​​​​​​​
      1. (3a.1) Due to all Basecamp activities being required, absences may not be excused unless they are of an urgent nature specified in the Universal Attendance Excused Absence Policy.
      2. (3a.2) Students must submit a notification of an absence due to illness, health care for which appointments cannot be rescheduled, or personal emergency using the Absence Request Form.

​​​​​​​Updated by Dean's Office September 2023

  1.  FoMS Attendance Policy 

    • (1a) Required learning activities for FoMS courses are designated as such in student course calendars or in communication from course chairs, core educators, and coordinators. See students’ course calendars or communication from course chairs or course coordinators for more details for each session.  
      When missing a required session, students will need to take into account the effect of their absence on the function of their small groups and the ability of their educators to provide feedback on skills and provide both informal and formal assessments. For small group activities including those in Foundations of Practice (FoP) where students are assigned a role, it is the student’s responsibility to communicate with their group to reassign roles when missing a session with required attendance.  

    • (1b) For required sessions, students are expected to attend on their assigned date. For required sessions, students are expected to attend for the entire duration of the session.  

      1. (1c.1) Students must inform the Curricular Affairs Office, if they anticipate the rare event of arriving late and/or leaving a required session early. 

      2. (1c.2) Students who arrive late and/or students who leave the required session early who do not inform the Curricular Affairs Office beforehand will be marked absent to required sessions. 

      3. (1c.3) Students seeking to attend on a date other than their originally assigned one must submit an absence request form to Curricular Affairs Office 

    • (1c) Attendance will be recorded for all required learning activities (in-person, virtual, and hybrid activities) during FoMS. 

    • (1d) Attendance at required sessions will be tracked and reviewed by the Academic Performance Committee following each Pit Stop week. 

  2. FoMS Absence Policy  

    • (2a) In the rare case that a student needs to miss one of these required sessions for personal reasons, they must complete the Absence Request Form at least 7 days prior to the absence.  

    • (2b) Failure to notify the Curricular Affairs Office at least 7 days prior to missing a required session for any reason other than a medical need or personal emergency will result in an unexcused absence and a Professionalism Concern Report will be issued.  

    • (2c) In the event a student needs to report an absence of an urgent nature, email the Curricular Affairs Office at CA@mednet.ucla.edu. All absences will require submission of an Absence Request Form. For students with an emergency, the Absence Request Form should be submitted as soon as this is feasible in the setting of the underlying circumstances.

    • (2d) For any absence, the Course Chair(s) or Course Coordinator will determine how missed coursework can be remediated to fulfill course requirements. Students are responsible for material they miss due to an excused absence.  

    • (2e) Faculty are not required to contact a student who has missed a required attendance session, but makeup work may be assigned at the discretion of FoMS leadership. Should a student miss a session with required attendance, it is their responsibility to learn the content covered in that session. 

    • (2g) EACE Absence Policy 

      1. (2g.1) In the rare instance a student expects an absence during EACE, please complete the Absence Request Form at least 7 days in advance of the session and alert the EACE Site Director as soon as possible. 

      2. (2g.2) EACE Site Directors cannot approve a change in date for required sessions or approve absences. 

      3. (2g.3) If a student has an unexpected absence for EACE, contact ca@mednet.ucla.edu immediately and include the EACE Site Director(s).  

      4. (2g.4) Students who miss one EACE session will be required to participate in the designated make-up EACE session scheduled at the end of the academic year.  

      5. (2g.5) Students who miss an EACE session will have an “incomplete” self-assessment, which they must complete after attending the make-up session. 
        For students outside of the Tuesday/Wednesday footprint, please reference the schedules provided by the Site Director(s) for designated make-up session dates. 

      6. (2g.6) In the event that a student is absent to more than one EACE session during the year, they are responsible for arranging additional make-up session dates in coordination with their Site Director(s) and must promptly inform the Curricular Affairs Office once the makeup session dates have been finalized. 

      7. (2g.7) All 12 site-visits must be completed by the conclusion of the last makeup session in order to pass the EACE course. 

  3. FoMS Procedures

    • (3a) Permission for an excused absence from a FoMS required educational activity is granted at the discretion of the Curricular Affairs Office.

    • (3b) In the rare case that a student needs to miss one of these required sessions for personal reasons, they must complete the Absence Request Form at least 7 days prior to the absence.

      1. (3b.1) Student fills out absence request form and submits form to Curricular Affairs Office for approval

      2. (3b.2) Course chair/Coordinator outlines any consequences and/or make-up work for missed activities

    • (3c) Requests for an excused absence submitted less than 7 days prior to the absence will not be considered (except for acute illness and emergencies)

    • (3d) Appeal of a denied request for an excused absence:

      1. (3d.1) ) If a student is not approved for a requested absence that they believe meets the requirements for an excused absence, the student may appeal the decision in writing directly to the Associate Dean for Curricular Affairs within 72 hours of receiving the denial notification.

      2. (3d.2) The Associate Dean for Curricular Affairs makes the final decision about the absence request and may consult with the Curricular Affairs Office as needed.

    • (3e) Students must submit a notification of an absence due to illness, health care for which appointments cannot be rescheduled, or personal emergency using the Absence Request Form.

Updated by DGSOM Dean's Office September 2023

  1. Intersessions Attendance Policy

    • (1a) All learning activities for Intersessions are required. See students’ course calendars or communication from course chairs or course coordinators for more details for each session.
      Site-specific onboarding activities (e.g., Live Scan, obtaining your badge, completing paperwork or training modules, etc.) should be completed outside of in-person sessions during the course.  You will not be excused from required in-person sessions/activities during Intersessions to complete these onboarding activities.

    • (1b) Attendance will be recorded for all required learning activities during Intersessions.

    • (1c) For any absence, the Course Chair(s) or Course Coordinator will determine how and by when missed coursework can be remediated to fulfill course requirements. Students are responsible to remediate material they miss due to an absence.

    • (1d) In the event a student needs to report an absence of an urgent nature, email the Curricular Affairs Office at CA@mednet.ucla.edu. All absences will require submission of an Absence Request Form. For students with an emergency, the Absence Request Form should be submitted as soon as this is feasible in the setting of the underlying circumstances.

    • (1e) Students are expected to attend required sessions on their assigned date and time. Students are expected to attend for the entire duration of the session.

      1. (1e.1) Students must inform the Curricular Affairs Office, course coordinator, and course director if they anticipate the rare event of arriving late and/or leaving a required session early.

      2. (1e.2) Students who arrive 10 or more minutes late and/or students who leave a session early who do not inform the Curricular Affairs Office, course coordinator, and course director beforehand (or as soon as possible in the setting of an emergency that makes communication prior to a session impossible or the setting or an unanticipated urgent issue that arises during a session) will receive an Unexcused Absence Notification. 

    • (1f) Attendance will be recorded for all learning activities

  2. Intersessions Absences

    • (2a) Unexcused absence(s) during the course will result in an Unexcused Absence Notification, which may be referred to the Academic Performance Committee and may lead to a change in student academic standing.
    • (2b) If a student needs to miss a required session for any reason, the student must contact the Curricular Affairs Office, Course Director, and Course Coordinator before the session begins or as soon as feasible for students with an unanticipated emergency that makes communication ahead of time impossible.
    • (3c) Failure to notify the Curricular Affairs Office, Course Director, and Course Coordinator as specified in (1e.2) above will result in an unexcused absence.
    • (3d) Forgetting to sign in to a required session once will result in a warning. Forgetting to sign in a second time will result in an unexcused absence.
    • (3e) Because each Intersessions Course is only one week in length, attendance for the entire week is critical to maximizing the educational experience. As such, absences for non-emergency events (e.g., academic conferences, weddings, etc.) will not be excused. Students are expected to review the academic calendar in advance and plan accordingly.
  3. Intersessions Procedures

    • (3a) Due to all Intersession activities being required, absences may not be excused unless they are of an urgent nature specified in the Universal Attendance Excused Absence Policy.
    • (3b) Students must submit a notification of an absence due to illness, health care for which appointments cannot be rescheduled, or personal emergency using the Absence Request Form
    • (3c) In submitting the notification, it is the student’s professional responsibility to notify the course chair, the course coordinator and (where relevant) the course faculty, such as core educators, of the absence due to illness, healthcare for which appointments cannot be rescheduled, or personal emergency.

Updated by DGSOM Dean's Office September 2023

  1. Attendance Policy for Core Clerkships Overview

    • (1a) The medical student work hour policy regarding the amount of time students spend in required activities, including the total required hours spent in clinical and educational activities during clinical rotations, is based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) general guidelines. All clinical courses are committed to and responsible for promoting patient safety while promoting medical student well-being and providing a supportive educational environment. Clinical courses must ensure that faculty provide appropriate supervision of medical students in patient care activities.
  2. Work Hours for Clerkships

    • (2a) Maximum Hours of Work per Week
      Duty hours must be limited to 80 hours per week, averaged over the course of the rotation, inclusive of all in-house call, clinical and formal educational activities. These hours do not take into account studying done by students outside of required activities.
    • (2b) Maximum Duty Period Length
      Duty periods for students must not exceed 28 hours of continuous scheduled duty.
    • (2c) Minimum Time Off between Scheduled Duty
      Students must have at least 8 hours free of clinical work and required education between clinical shifts and/or required educational sessions. After 24 hours of continuous call, students must have at least 14 hours free of clinical work and/or required education.
    • (2d) Maximum In-House On-Call Frequency
      Students must be scheduled for in-house calls no more frequently than every third night when averaged over the course of the rotation. No overnight call is permitted before exams.
    • (2e) Mandatory Time Free of Duty
      Students must be scheduled for a minimum of one day free of duty per week when averaged over the course of the clerkship or elective.
      Violations of the Duty Hour Policy are automatically sent to the Clerkship Chair and Assistant Dean for Clinical Education. Students should feel free to contact the Clerkship Chair and Assistant Dean for Clinical Education with any additional concerns.
    • (2f) Required Reporting of Duty Hours
      Regular reporting of duty hours is required in all core clerkships. In addition, violations of the Duty Hour Policy should be reported to the Site Director, Clerkship Chair, and/or the Dean’s Office.
    • (2g) DGSOM Technical Standards
      Students are encouraged to thoroughly review DGSOM Technical Standards. Any student with an existing disability, or who develops a disability (permanent or temporary), and wishes to seek an accommodation must notify the Director for DGSOM Disability Services (an extension of the UCLA Center for Accessible Education) in writing via the private online application process. The UCLA Center for Accessible Education will consult with the School of Medicine to notify them of a student’s request and recommended accommodations. For more information about DGSOM Disability Services, review their webpage.  
  3. Clerkship Make-up Days

    • (3a) Students will need to complete a commensurate number of clinical make-up days for any excused absences that exceed two (2) total days on any given clerkship.
      1. (3a.1) The aforementioned two (2) total days on any given clerkship may only be used for Excused Absences described in Section 1a of the Universal Attendance and Absence Policies: (1) illness, (2) health care appointments which cannot be rescheduled, and (3) personal emergencies.
    • (3b) Make-up days will be determined by the Clerkship Chair(s) and may need to be completed at a future time if there are insufficient make-up days that can be scheduled during the clerkship.
    • (3c) For any absence, the Course Chair(s) or Course Coordinator will determine how missed coursework can be remediated to fulfill course requirements.
  4. Clerkship Excused Absences

    • (4a) For absences of an urgent nature, as described in section 1a of the Universal Attendance and Absence Policy, please contact the Site Director, Clerkship Chair, Executive Clerkship Coordinator and your clinical team to let them know you will not be in attendance.
    • (4b) In the event a student needs to report an absence of an urgent nature, email the Curricular Affairs Office at CA@mednet.ucla.edu. All absences will require submission of an Absence Request Form. For students with an emergency, the Absence Request Form should be submitted as soon as this is feasible in the setting of the underlying circumstances.
  5. Clerkship Unexcused Absences

    • (5a) Unexcused absence(s) during the clerkship may result in automatic failure requiring the student to repeat the clerkship rotation.
    • (5b) If a student needs to miss clerkship activities for any reason, the student must contact the clinical team, the Clerkship Chair, and the Coordinator before the session begins.
    • (5c) Failure to notify these individuals in advance of the missed session will result in an unexcused absence.
  6. Clerkship Schedule Requests

    • (6a) It is the student’s responsibility to contact the Clerkship Chair/Coordinator and Site Director/Coordinator at least 30-days in advance of the clerkship to request an adjustment to scheduled days off.
    • (6b) Submitting the Required Clerkship Schedule Absence Request Form does not guarantee that a request can be accommodated. Due to the importance of the required clerkship education and the complexity of clerkship scheduling, it may not always be possible to grant a request.
    • (6c) All schedule request submissions will be reviewed by the Clerkship Chairs(s) who will make a final determination.
  7. Religious Observances during Clerkships

    • (7a) Faculty and staff are committed to supporting diversity at DGSOM. The DGSOM at UCLA allows for the observance of religious holidays; however, students are required to make up missed time. Medical students are professionals with a responsibility for patient care that may require them to work on religious holidays.
    • (7b) Students must request approval for absence for the observance of religious holidays from the Clerkship Chair at least 30-days prior to the start of the clerkship. Attempts will be made to adjust the student’s schedule to allow for the use of a day off on the requested religious holiday.
    • (7c) The Clerkship Chair will notify the Site Director and Clerkship Coordinator of any approved absences. Should the requested number of religious holidays exceed the maximum days off for the clerkship (one day per week, averaged over the course of the clerkship), requests for time off for religious holidays and observances must be discussed with the Associate Dean of Student Affairs to ensure that clerkship requirements are fulfilled.
  8. Clerkship Days Off

    • (8a) According to the DGSOM Duty Hour Policy for the Clinical Years, students must be scheduled for a minimum of one day free of duty per week when averaged over the course of the clerkship or elective.
  9. University Holidays during Clerkships

    • (9a) All medical students on core clerkships are excused from clinical duties on Thursday and Friday of Thanksgiving week.
    • (9b) Students are required to be present on all other holidays and holiday observations if the clinical service is operational.
  10. Vacation during Clerkships

    • (10a) All medical students on core clerkships are excused from clinical responsibilities during Winter Break. See the Calendars site for dates.
  11. Clerkship Procedures

    • (11a) Absences on core clerkships may not be excused unless they are of an urgent nature specified in the Universal Attendance Excused Absence Policy.
    • (11b) In the event that a student has an absence on a core clerkship, students must submit a notification of the absence due to illness or personal emergency using the Absence Request Form
      1. (11b.1) In submitting the notification, it is the student’s professional responsibility to notify the clerkship chair, executive clerkship coordinator, and their clinical team
    • (11c) It is the student’s responsibility to contact the Clerkship Chair/Coordinator and Site Director/Coordinator at least 30-days in advance of the clerkship to request an adjustment to scheduled days off via the Absence Request Form
      1. (11c.1) All schedule request submissions will be reviewed by the Clerkship Chairs(s) who will make a final determination within 5 business days of submission.
      2. (11c.2) Student submission of the form does not guarantee approval of the request of an adjustment to scheduled days off. Due to the importance of the required clerkship education and the complexity of clerkship scheduling, it may not always be possible to grant a request.

Updated by DGSOM Dean's Office September 2023

  1. Discovery Attendance Policy 

    • (1a) During Discovery, students pursuing Area of Concentration experiences are expected to engage in approximately 40 hours/week of Discovery-related work. We recognize that specific schedules and location of work (in-person or remote) and degree of flexibility may vary based on individual projects.  
    • (1b) Students and their mentors must also ensure time is allotted for weekly Longitudinal Clinical Experience activities. Students should adhere to expectations co-created with their mentors and are reminded of DGSOM’s policy on professionalism. 
    • (1c) For any absence the Course Director and/or Course Coordinator will determine how missed coursework can be remediated to fulfill course requirements. 
    • (1d) Attendance will be recorded for all required learning activities during Discovery. 
    • (1e) If a student needs to miss clerkship activities for any reason, the student must contact the Course Director and Course Coordinator before the session begins. 
    • (1f) Failure to notify these individuals in advance of the missed session will result in an unexcused absence. 
    • (1g) In the event a student needs to report an absence of an urgent nature, email the Curricular Affairs Office at CA@mednet.ucla.edu. All absences will require submission of an Absence Request Form. For students with an emergency, the Absence Request Form should be submitted as soon as this is feasible in the setting of the underlying circumstances.
  2. Longitudinal Clinical Experience (LCE) Attendance Policy 

    • (2a) During the Longitudinal Clinical Experience (LCE), students are expected to engage in 24 half day sessions seeing patients with their Preceptor-Coach. Twelve (12) of these sessions are with a Generalist and twelve are with a Specialist or Sub-specialist. While specific calendar weeks are allocated for these sessions, students have flexibility to work with their Preceptor-Coaches on alternate weeks, including vacation weeks, if needed. There are also two scheduled make-up weeks at the end of LCE. 
      1. (2a.1) During LCE, students are also expected to spend a half day per week engaged in self-directed learning activities. These can include self-study of skill-building exercises and/or career exploration with DGSOM faculty across all fields of medicine. 
    • (2b) Students must ensure that time engaged in LCE activities on non-alloted weeks does not interfere with Discovery activities. Students should adhere to expectations co-created with their Preceptor-Coaches and are reminded of DGSOM’s policy on professionalism. 
    • (2c) After each LCE Preceptor-Coach meeting, students are expected to summarize the formative feedback they receive using the LCE Feedback and Attendance form. Upon submission, a copy of the form will be sent to the assigned Preceptor-Coach, the student, and LCE course coordinator. Attendance is documented by submitting this form. Failure to submit this form after each session will result in the session not being documented and, therefore, not counted toward fulfilling the course requirements until submitted. 
    • (2d) If students know they will be unable to attend a scheduled session with their Preceptor-Coach, they must notify them and arrange a mutually convenient time to make up the half-day session. 
    • (2e) In the event a student needs to report an absence of an urgent nature, email the Curricular Affairs Office at CA@mednet.ucla.edu, the LCE course Coordinator, and include the Preceptor-Coach with whom they have a scheduled session. All absences will require submission of an Absence Request Form. For students with an emergency, the Absence Request Form should be submitted as soon as this is feasible in the setting of the underlying circumstances.
  3. Vacation during Discovery and LCE 

    • (3a) All medical students in Discovery are excused from curricular responsibilities during Winter Break and Academic holidays. See Academic Calendar on the Calendars page.
  4. Discovery Procedures

    • (4a) Permission for an excused absence from a Discovery required educational activity is granted at the discretion of Discovery Course Leadership and the Curricular Affairs Office.
    • (4b) If a student needs to miss a required session, they must complete the Absence Request Form at least 7 days prior to their absence.
      1. (4b.1) Student fills out the Absence Request Form and submits form to Curricular Affairs Office for approval.
      2. (4b.2) Upon approval, Curricular Affairs Office shares form with course faculty leads for review.
    • (4c) Requests for an excused absence submitted less than 7 days prior to the absence will not be considered (except for acute illness and emergencies).
    • (4d) ) In submitting the notification, it is the student’s professional responsibility to notify the course chair and the course coordinator of the approved absence.

 Updated by DGSOM Dean's Office September 2023  

  1. Excused Absences during FFY and AFI 

    • (1a) All learning activities for FFY and AFI are required. See students’ course calendars or communication from course chairs or course coordinators for more details for each session. 
    • (1b) Attendance will be recorded for all required learning activities during FFY and AFI. 
    • (1c) For any absence, the Course Chair(s) or Course Coordinator will determine how and by when missed coursework can be remediated to fulfill course requirements. Students are responsible to remediate material they miss due to an absence. 
    • (1d) In the event a student needs to report an absence of an urgent nature, email the Curricular Affairs Office at CA@mednet.ucla.edu. All absences will require submission of an Absence Request Form. For students with an emergency, the Absence Request Form should be submitted as soon as this is feasible in the setting of the underlying circumstances.
    • (1e) Students are expected to attend required sessions on their assigned date and time. Students are expected to attend for the entire duration of the session.  
      1. (1e.1) Students must inform the Curricular Affairs Office, course coordinator, and course director if they anticipate the rare event of arriving late and/or leaving a required session early. 
      2. (1e.2) Students who arrive 10 or more minutes late and/or students who leave a session early who do not inform the Curricular Affairs Office, course coordinator, and course director beforehand (or as soon as possible in the setting of an emergency that makes communication prior to a session impossible or the setting of an unanticipated urgent issue that arises during a session) will receive an Unexcused Absence Notification. 
    • (1f) Attendance will be recorded for all learning activities.
  2. FFY & AFI Procedures

    • (2a) Due to all FFY and AFI activities being required, absences may not be excused unless they are of an urgent nature specified in the Universal Attendance Excused Absence Policy.
    • (2b) Students must submit a notification of an absence due to illness, health care for which appointments cannot be rescheduled, or personal emergency using the Absence Request Form
    • (2c) In submitting the notification, it is the student’s professional responsibility to notify the course chair, the course coordinator and (where relevant) the course faculty, such as core educators, of the absence due to illness, health care for which appointments cannot be rescheduled, or personal emergency.

 Updated by DGSOM Dean's Office September 2023

  1. Excused Absences during 4th Year Electives 

    • (1a) For absences of an urgent nature, please contact the Site Director, Coordinator and your clinical team to let them know you will not be in attendance. 
    • (1b) In the event a student needs to report an absence of an urgent nature, email the Curricular Affairs Office at CA@mednet.ucla.edu. All absences will require submission of an Absence Request Form. For students with an emergency, the Absence Request Form should be submitted as soon as this is feasible in the setting of the underlying circumstances.
  2. Unexcused Absences during 4th Year Electives 

    • (2a) An unexcused absence may result in automatic failure, requiring the student to repeat the course. 
    • (2b) Failure to notify course chair, coordinator, and clinical team will result in an unexcused absence. 
  3. Religious Observances during 4th Year Electives 

    • (3a) Faculty and staff are committed to supporting diversity at DGSOM. The DGSOM at UCLA allows for the observance of religious holidays; however, students are required to make up missed time. Medical students are professionals with a responsibility for patient care that may require them to work on religious holidays.  
    • (3b) Students must request approval for absence for the observance of religious holidays from the Course Chair at least one month prior to the start of the elective. Attempts will be made to adjust the student’s schedule to allow for the use of a day off on the requested religious holiday or rescheduling of clinical shifts. 
    • (3c) The Course Chair will notify the coordinator and clinical team of any approved absences. Should the requested number of religious holidays exceed the maximum days off for the elective, then these requests must be discussed with the Associate Dean of Student Affairs to ensure that course requirements are fulfilled. 
  4. University Holidays during 4th Year Electives 

    • (4a) All medical students are excused from clinical duties on Thanksgiving Day.  
    • (4b) Students are required to be present on all other holidays and holiday observances if the clinical service is operational. 
    • (4c) For any absence, the Course Chair(s) will determine how missed time will be made up in order to fulfill course requirements. 
      1. (4c.1) For electives scheduled to fulfill the requirements for consecutive weeks of DGSOM Sub-Is (300-level, 400-level, and ICU electives):  
        • (4c.1a) If missed time during such electives cannot be made up before the elective concludes, then the elective will not count towards fulfilling the graduation requirements for consecutive weeks of DGSOM Sub-Is (300-level, 400-level, and ICU electives).  
        • (4c.1b) The student may make arrangements (if permitted by the Course Chair, and schedule permitting) to complete the elective at a later date to earn elective credit towards the total number of weeks of elective training to meet graduation requirements, but not towards the 12 weeks of required consecutive 300-level, 400-level and ICU training.  
      2. (4c.2) For electives not scheduled to fulfill the requirements for consecutive weeks of DGSOM Sub-Is (300-level, 400-level, and ICU electives):   
        • (4c.2a) If missed time during such electives cannot be made up before the elective concludes, if permitted by the Course Chair and schedule permitting, the student may make arrangements to complete the elective at a later date to earn elective credit towards the total number of weeks of elective training to meet graduation requirements. 
  5. Days Off Policy for the MS-4 Year 

    • (5a) According to the David Geffen School of Medicine (DGSOM) Duty Hours Policy for the Clinical Years, students must have 1 day off per week, averaged over the course of the elective.  
    • (5b) For electives in which students have no duties scheduled on weekends: 
      1. (5b.1) The weekend days are considered the scheduled days off. 
      2. (5b.2) During these electives, students are not permitted to request additional days off between Monday and Friday, except for emergencies as described above. 
      3. (5b.3) In some cases, if the service does have clinical activities during the weekend, a student may request the approval of the Course Chair and supervising resident and attending to work on the weekend in place of an equivalent number of weekdays for certain events. However, these scheduling requests should be discussed with the Course Chair in advance of the start of the course. 
    • (5c) For electives in which students have weekend duties: 
      1. (5c.1) Students will have 1 day off per week averaged over the rotation (e.g., 3 days off for a 3-week elective). 
      2. (5c.2) Students may request a change to their scheduled days off to accommodate residency interviews, but approval must be obtained from the course chair and supervising resident and attending (when applicable). 
  6. Policy for Scheduling Residency Interviews

    • (6a) Interviews for Internship/Residency are not excused absences.  
    • (6b) Students may not request days off for interviews during scheduled elective rotations (except during research electives).  
    • (6c) Students may use scheduled days off for interview purposes. As noted above, students may request a change to their scheduled day(s) off to accommodate residency interviews but must obtain approval from the course chair and supervising resident and attending (when applicable). 
    • (6d) As noted above, students may request approval from the Course Chair and supervising resident and attending for time off during the week for an interview if the rotation is one in which the student may be able to work on a weekend to make up the missed day(s). 
  7. Fourth Year Electives Procedures

    • (7a) Absences on scheduled fourth year electives may not be excused unless they are of an urgent nature specified in the Universal Attendance Excused Absence Policy.
    • (7b) In the event that a student has an absence on a fourth year elective, students must submit a notification of the absence due to illness or personal emergency using the Absence Request Form
    • (7c) In submitting the notification, it is the student’s professional responsibility to notify the elective chair, coordinator and the clinical team.

 Updated by DGSOM Dean's Office September 2023

Revised July 2020

Core Clinical Experiences

Purpose

To delineate the requirements for core clinical experiences and the provision of mid-clerkship feedback for the required clinical clerkships.

Overview

The completion of the core clinical clerkships is a joint obligation between the students, the student’s supervising physicians, and the site director/clerkship chair. In turn, logging and reviewing the patient log helps site directors and clerkship chairs ensure that students are meeting the clerkship learning objectives and allows monitoring of the comparability of clinical experiences. These processes align with LCME standards 6.2 Required Clinical Experiences, 8.6 Monitoring of Completion of Required Clinical Experiences, and 9.7 Formative Assessment and Feedback.

Policy

  • Clerkships will establish and publish a list of required clinical experiences that students must complete to meet clerkship requirements.
  • Students are responsible for maintaining the patient log of clinical experiences for all patients they see in an ongoing manner during required clerkships.
  • The students will receive feedback from supervising faculty and/or clerkship site directors midway through the rotation. This feedback should include an assessment of the student’s performance in comparison to clerkship objectives and the School of Medicine clinical performance rubric, and may also include a review of the patient log of clinical experiences.
  • The clerkship chair, site directors, and coordinators will track completion of mid-clerkship feedback. Aggregate data on mid-clerkship feedback is reviewed with the clerkship chairs committee regularly.
  • Failure of a student to maintain a log of required clinical experiences and/or to complete all required experiences or their equivalent by the end of the clerkship will result in an Incomplete.
  • An Incomplete will be converted to the appropriate clerkship grade once all required experiences or their equivalent have been completed and the patient log updated.

Procedures

  • Students must log all of their patient encounters per the established list of required clinical experiences specific to each clerkship on an ongoing basis throughout each clerkship.
  • Each student should discuss any outstanding clinical experiences with the supervising physicians, and with the site director prior to the conclusion of the clerkship, including alternative activities that can be used to fulfill clerkship requirements.

Duty Hours

Maximum Hours of Work per Week

Duty hours must be limited to 80 hours per week, averaged over the course of the rotation, inclusive of all in-house call, clinical and educational activities.

Maximum Duty Period Length

Duty periods for students must not exceed 28 hours of continuous scheduled duty.

Minimum Time Off between Scheduled Duty

Students must have at least 8 hours free of clinical work and required education between clinical shifts and/or required educational sessions. After 24 hours of continuous call, students must have at least 14 hours free of clinical work and/or required education.

Maximum In-House On-Call Frequency

Students must be scheduled for in-house calls no more frequently than every third night when averaged over the course of the rotation.

Note: No overnight call is permitted before exams or Systems Based Health Care/Preceptorship.

Mandatory Time Free of Duty

Students must be scheduled for a minimum of one day free of duty per week when averaged over the course of the clerkship or elective.

Note: Violations of the Duty Hour Policy are automatically sent to the Clerkship Chair and Assistant Dean for Clinical Education. Students should feel free to contact the Clerkship Chair and Assistant Dean for Clinical Education with any additional concerns.

Mandatory Reporting of Duty Hours

Regular reporting of duty hours is required in all core clerkships. In addition, violations of the Duty Hour Policy should be reported to the Site Director, Clerkship Chair, and/or the Dean’s Office.

Approved by FEC on January 4, 2017

Evaluation and Grading

  1. Overview

    • (1.1) Grading is Pass/Fail in the pre-clerkship year
  2. Requirements to Pass FoMS
    • (2.1) A passing grade in the FoMS course is required to begin the core clerkship year. In order to receive a grade of Pass, students must do the following: 
      1. Attend and participate in lab, interactive large group sessions, and small group sessions.
      2. Attend and participate in all Early Authentic Clinical Experience visits.
      3. Complete all coursework, assignments, make-up or remediation work, as specified in course syllabi and guides.
      4. Complete all required National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) exams.
      5. Complete all Pit Stop Computer Examinations, Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), and Anatomy Practicals.
        • (5a) Students who do not reach a pre-established threshold score on any of these Pit Stop examinations must utilize resources available to close their knowledge or performance gaps as directed by Course Director and/or Academic Performance Committee
          • Foundations of Practice (FoP) Computer Examination
            1. Attend the Pit Stop Computer Examination Review session.
            2. Utilize Educator for Excellence (E4E) or other coaching.
            3. Meet with a Society Dean and/or Charles Drew University (CDU) Dean.
          • Scientific Foundations of Medicine (SFM) Computer Examination
            1. Attend the Pit Stop Computer Examination Review session.
            2. Meet with core faculty from SFM for content review.
            3. Utilize Academic Support Office resources.
            4. Meet with a Society Dean and/or Charles Drew University (CDU) Dean.
          • OSCE Examination
            1. Meet with FoP leadership to review OSCE examinations.
            2. Utilize Education for Excellence or other coaching.
            3. Meet with a Society Dean and/or Charles Drew University (CDU) Dean.
          • Anatomy Practical
            1. Attend sessions with Anatomy leadership to review Anatomy content covered on Anatomy practical.
            2. Meet with a Society Dean and/or Charles Drew University (CDU) Dean.
        • (5b) If a student does not reach threshold multiple times, does not reach threshold in multiple domains, or there are other concerns aside from exam performance, there will be additional recommendations and/or requirements from the Academic Performance Committee. Any such recommendations and/or requirements will be outlined in the student’s Individualized Learning Plan.
        • (5c) Students who do not reach the threshold score on FoP or SFM Computer Examinations must reach a prespecified threshold score on a retest examination administered at several pre-established times during the year.
          • Students who do not meet the threshold score on a retest examination will receive a FoMS grade of incomplete and will be required to take additional retests until the threshold score is met.
            1. Once the threshold score is met on a retest examination, the incomplete grade will be changed to a grade of pass if all other requirements of the FoMS course have been satisfied.
          • The start of the core clerkship year will be delayed for those who do not meet the threshold score on the last pre-established retest examination.
          • Repeated difficulties reaching the threshold score on retest examinations may lead to requirements that extend medical school training beyond four years.
    • (2.2) Students will not be required to repeat a block of content or the first year of medical school solely for not reaching a threshold score on one or multiple examinations.
      1. Students may be asked to repeat a block of content or even the entire MS1 year should they repeatedly not reach the threshold score on multiple examinations while not utilizing the resources listed above or not attending required attendance sessions.
        • The Year 1 Academic Performance Committee (APC) will make a recommendation for a student to repeat a block of content or the first year of medical school on a student-by-student basis. Any APC recommendation for a student to remediate a block or year will be referred to the committee on academic standing, progress, and promotion (CASPP) for final determinations and possible changes in academic standing.
    • (2.3) To ensure full academic and social support, the following people may be notified if a student does not reach the threshold score on a Pit Stop examination. All of these individuals, except for E4Es, attend APC meetings.
      • Associate Dean for Curricular Affairs
      • Associate Dean for Student Affairs (UCLA and CDU)
      • Assistant Deans for Student Affairs (Society Deans)
      • Assistant Deans for Curricular Affairs
      • Course Directors and Associate Directors
      • Director of Student Affairs
      • Director of Curricular Affairs
      • Curricular Affairs Pre-Clerkship supervisor
      • Curricular Affairs FoMS coordinators
      • Academic Support Office personnel
      • Director of Disability Services
      • APC Administrator
      • A student’s Educator for Excellence (for the FoP Computer Examination and OSCE only)
  3. Requests for Evaluation Modifications/Grade Changes

    • (3.1) Students are alerted by e-mail when a grade has been finalized. Students who feel there is an error in their grade may submit a written request for a grade review to the Course Chair within 14 days of grade submission.

    • (3.2) Per UCLA Academic Senate regulations, only the course instructor of record has the responsibility and right to determine and assign a final grade. Any student claiming that a grade was assigned for other than academic reasons needs to provide written documentation to support their assertion.

Approved by the Medical Education Committee August 2023; Approved by Faculty Executive Committee September 2023

Archive

  1. Overview

    • (1.1) This policy describes the procedure for assigning final clerkship grades for DGSOM medical students.  In March 2022, the Medical Education Committee voted in favor of core clerkships being graded on a Pass/Fail basis effective as of the 2022-2023 academic year.  Grading of 4th-year electives remains unchanged as described below.  An Overall Clerkship Grade is reported on each student’s transcript.  
    • (1.2) The policy is updated annually at the beginning of each academic year and applies to all students completing clerkships/electives within that year. 
  2. Overall Grades for Core Clinical Clerkships

    • (2.1) The Core Clinical Clerkships include Emergency Medicine, Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Surgery. The possible grades for each Core Clinical Clerkship are: Pass, Fail, or Incomplete. Grades are submitted and available for student review within six weeks of clerkship completion.  The Clerkship Chair may assign the Incomplete grade to either the clinical or final examination grade (which in turn translates to an Incomplete overall grade) when either the clinical work is of passing quality but is incomplete, or the final examination has not been taken.  A grade of Incomplete in core clerkships is resolved after the student satisfactorily completes clinical coursework, as specified by the Clerkship Chair, and/or the final examination or the time to meet those requirements expires. The Incomplete grade remains on the transcript until resolved and all Incomplete Clerkships must be passed before proceeding to 4th year coursework.
    • (2.2) For the Core Clinical Clerkships, an Overall Clerkship Grade of Pass or Fail is assigned.  In order to receive a grade of Pass, students must complete all clerkship requirements and achieve the minimum passing standard for both clinical performance and the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Shelf Exam.  
  3. Clinical Grade Contribution

    • (3.1) The Clinical Grade is calculated and reviewed by each Core Clerkship Chair in collaboration with the Clerkship Grading Committee. The Clerkship Chair and Grading Committee use a rubric tallying 13 possible evaluations of clinical skills for the Core Clerkships.  
    • (3.2) The Clinical Skills on the DGSOM-UCLA Clerkship Evaluation Form include: 
      1. History Taking
      2. Physical Examination
      3. Fund of Knowledge
      4. Differential Diagnosis Development
      5. Treatment Plan Generation
      6. Medical Record Documentation
      7. Oral Presentations
      8. Communication with Patients and Families 
      9. Communication with the Interprofessional Team
      10. Humanism
      11. Integrity and Work Ethic
      12. Commitment to Learning
      13. System-Based Practice
    • (3.3) Each clinical skill is rated using criterion-based anchors along four levels of performance.  For each clinical skill, the evaluator will choose the descriptor amongst the four possible options that best describe the student’s performance. If an evaluation of a clinical skill is not possible due to lack of observation, the evaluator should select “Unable to Evaluate/Insufficient Contact.”  For each Core Clerkship, the Clerkship Chair(s) and Site Director(s) will produce a summative evaluation as well as a composite narrative. 
    • (3.4) The Clerkship Chair in collaboration with the Clerkship Grading Committee assigns a Clinical Performance Grade by calculating a Total Evaluation Score from a compilation of the individual evaluations of clinical skills received, which is a percentage value of the total score possible. Because the number of clinical skills assessed may vary by clerkship, each Total Evaluation Score is calculated as a percentage. If a student receives evaluations for all 13 clinical skills, the denominator for the percentage calculation is 13; if only 9 competencies are assessed, the denominator is 9.  Each Evaluation Score will then be calculated as a ratio against the highest score possible – the highest score possible being that which would be arrived at if all clinical skills were scored at the highest level. For example, if 9 items are submitted, the maximum score is 36 (4 X 9); for all 13 clinical skills, 52 (4 X 13). Each student is evaluated by descriptive anchors and these are assigned a value on a scale 1-4. A null value is assigned for designations of "insufficient contact or unable to comment" for any of the clinical skills. Based on a review of the total evaluation scores and the evaluator comments, the Clerkship Chairs have ultimate oversight of the final grades assigned for each clerkship.
    • (3.5) The Total Evaluation Score is then used to arrive at the Clinical Performance Grade. A total evaluation score > 48% will result in a clinical performance grade of Pass. A total evaluation score of <48% will result in a clinical performance grade of Fail.
      In addition to earning a Total Evaluation Score of at least 48% as above, to pass the clinical course, the student must meet a minimum performance standard in all 6 ACGME Competencies.  The 6 ACGME Competencies are listed below, along with the percentage of total available points required to PASS. 
      1. Patient Care (Clinical Skills 1 and 2) – 50% 

      2. Clinical Knowledge (Clinical Skills 3, 4 and 5) –33% 

      3. Interpersonal Skills (Clinical Skills 6, 7, 8 and 9) – 50% 

      4. Professionalism (Clinical Skills 10 and 11) – 50% 

      5. Practice-Based Learning (Clinical Skill 12) – 50% 

      6. Systems-Based Practice (Clinical Skill 13) – 25% 

    • (3.6) Student evaluation forms will be assigned to residents, fellows, attendings, and at times, other licensed health professional faculty as follows:  
      1. Clerkship Site Coordinators will obtain the list of residents, fellows, and attendings (and other licensed health professional faculty if applicable) with whom students have worked. When clinical service structure allows, the site coordinators will confirm the list of supervising physicians using the student schedules and resident, fellow and attending schedules. When discrepancies exist, the site coordinator will contact the supervising physician to confirm the appropriateness for evaluation. 
      2. Supervising physicians who have had sufficient contact to fairly evaluate student performance on at least one clinical skill will be expected to complete individual evaluations. 
      3. A composite of all individual evaluations submitted will be utilized in assessing student performance, with collaboration between Site Directors and Clerkship Chair(s) in assigning the final clinical performance grade. 
      4. A narrative assessment of each student’s performance is compiled utilizing the individual comments provided by evaluators, and the most representative descriptions from the “comments” section will be incorporated into the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE) letter for residency applications at the discretion of clerkship leadership. Prior to finalizing the summative evaluation, the narratives and comments are reviewed for language that may suggest bias.  The “feedback” section of the narrative evaluation will serve to provide meaningful feedback to the student about their clinical performance with recommendations for improvement.  Comments from the “feedback” section do not appear in the MSPE.  
    • (3.7) Students are alerted by email when a clerkship summative evaluation has been finalized and submitted to the Dean’s Office. Students who feel there is an error in their evaluation may request a review with the Clerkship Chair(s) to better understand their evaluation. This request must be submitted in writing to the Clerkship Chair(s) within 14 days of grade submission. Edits to the summative evaluations will be limited to errors such as incorrect names or pronouns, grammar, etc.  Clerkship Chairs do not add or delete comments from the MSPE section of the summative evaluation once submitted to the Dean’s Office.  Evaluations may not be revised by completing additional work with the exception of an incomplete.  
  4. Final Examination (NBME) Grade

    • (4.1) The NBME Shelf Exam minimum passing standard is set based on annual national percentile exam reports for each required clerkship.  The percentile score is Pass >5th percentile and Fail: < 5th percentile. 
    • (4.2) Percentile data is obtained from annual reports from the NBME for each of the eight clinical subject (shelf) exams. The scores corresponding to the percentile nearest (but above or equal) to the 5th percentile are identified at the beginning of each academic year, based on the last academic year.  
    • (4.3) The National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) ensures that each reported subject examination score is an accurate reflection of the responses for an examinee.  This is based on reliable scoring and reporting techniques backed by a variety of quality control and verification procedures by the NBME.  Given the above, DGSOM does not submit requests to the NBME for score re-checks on behalf of students. 
  5. Required Clerkship Radiology Course

    • (5.1) Students also complete asynchronous radiology modules relevant to each clerkship and take and pass a written radiology examination during each core clerkship. These scores are compiled upon completion of the clerkship year to arrive at a final radiology examination grade.  A minimum cumulative score of 70% is required to pass the course.  This grade does not appear on the transcript.    
  6. Course Failure Policy in the Core Clinical Clerkships

    • (6.1) Fail 1 clerkship exam (NBME shelf exam): 
      1. One clerkship exam failure will result in an Incomplete grade.  There is no change in the student’s academic/professional standing after the first clerkship exam failure.  There is no requirement for the student to suspend clerkship activity. 
      2. The student is permitted to retake the exam for a second attempt on a designated exam date following two weeks of study with no required clerkships. 
    • (6.2) Fail retest of a clerkship exam (NBME shelf exam):
      1. The student’s grade for that clerkship will remain Incomplete.  The student’s standing is changed to Experiencing Academic/Professional Difficulty.  There is no requirement for the student to suspend clerkship activity. 
      2. The student is permitted to retake the exam for a third attempt on a designated exam date following two weeks of study with no required clerkships. 
    • (6.3) Fail second re-test of clerkship exam (third attempt of NBME shelf exam):
      1. Three exam failures on the same clerkship will result in a grade of Fail/No Credit.  The student’s standing is changed to Academic/Professional Probation.  The student is required to repeat the clerkship in its entirety. 
      2. If the student repeats the clerkship and passes the clerkship examination on the fourth attempt, the grade will appear on the transcript with an asterisk designating that the course was repeated. 
      3. If the student fails the exam after repeating the clerkship (now a total of four failures on a single exam) this may result in a referral to CASPP for consideration of dismissal. 
    • (6.4) Students with Multiple Incomplete Clerkships
      1. If a student fails exams in two different clerkships, the student does not need to suspend future clerkship activity. The student is permitted to retake both failed exams on two different designated exam dates following two weeks of study for each exam with no required clerkships. 
      2. If a student fails or does not sit for exams in three different clerkships (three incomplete clerkships when adding exams either not taken or failed) the student will not be permitted to move forward in the curriculum. The student must drop their next clerkship(s) and enroll in an Independent Study course until at least one clerkship shelf exam has been taken and passed.  Students with two or fewer incomplete grades due to exam failures or missed exams will be permitted to remain in the curriculum but will need to retake the failed exam(s) at a later date, after two weeks of dedicated study time on an exam administration date. 
    • (6.5) Clinical Failure
      1. If a student fails the clinical portion of a clerkship, the student will receive a grade of “Fail” and must remediate by repeating the clerkship in its entirety, including the final examination, even if the exam was previously taken and passed. 
    • (6.6) Clinical Remediation Failure
      1. The only acceptable grade for remediation is “Pass." A grade of "Fail" upon remediation is not acceptable and will result in recommendation for dismissal to CASPP. 
  7. Overall Grades for Fourth Year Clinical Electives at DGSOM at UCLA

    • (7.1) Fourth-year clinical rotations (400 level, 300 level and 200 level with the exception of global health) are graded using the 4-tier Clinical Grade system of Honors/ High Pass/ Pass and Fail.  The UCLA Clinical Grading Rubric will be used to arrive at the Clinical Performance Grade as follows: 
      1. Total Evaluation Score 88-100% = Honors Clinical Grade Performance
      2. Total Evaluation Score 75-87% = High Pass Clinical Grade Performance
      3. Total Evaluation Score 48-74% = Pass Clinical Grade Performance
      4. Total Evaluation Score <48% = Fail Clinical Grade Performance

        As no written examinations are administered for fourth-year electives, the Clinical Performance Grade will be the Overall Grade for designated fourth-year elective rotations. Students must also meet the same minimum competencies as described in section 3.5 above for core clinical clerkships to pass graded fourth-year electives. 
    • (7.2) To achieve a Clinical Performance Grade of High Pass in a 4th-year clinical rotation, in addition to a total summative evaluation score of 75-87%, there can be no Clinical Skill evaluated at criterion level 1 on the summative evaluation, and the student must achieve a criterion level 3 or 4 in each applicable Professionalism Competency (Clinical Skills 10 and 11) as evaluated on the summative grade.  
    • (7.3) To achieve a Clinical Performance Grade of Honors in a 4th-year clinical rotation, in addition to a total summative evaluation score of > 88%, there can be no Clinical Skill evaluated at criterion level 1 or 2 on the summative evaluation, and the student must achieve a criterion level 4 in each applicable Professionalism Competency (Clinical Skills 10 and 11) as evaluated on the summative grade.
    • (7.4) A narrative assessment of each student’s performance is compiled utilizing the individual comments provided by evaluators, and the most representative descriptions from the “comments” section will be incorporated into the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE) letter for residency applications at the discretion of the Course Chair. The “feedback” section of the narrative evaluation will serve to provide meaningful feedback to the student about their clinical performance on the elective with recommendations for improvement.  Comments from the “feedback” section do not appear in the MSPE. 
      Based on review of the total evaluation scores and the evaluator comments, the Course Chair(s) have ultimate oversight of the final grades assigned for each course. As with clerkship grades, all narratives are reviewed by the course chair for bias prior to submission.  
    • (7.5) Course Chairs are asked to meet with students whose performance is failing in order to provide the student with feedback and recommendations to improve their performance.  In addition, the Associate Dean for Student Affairs will also be notified by the Course Chair as soon as possible of students who have been determined to be at risk of failing the course. 
    • (7.6) All performance evaluations and assessments must be submitted within four weeks of the conclusion of the course.  Students are alerted by email when an elective course grade has been finalized and submitted to the Dean’s Office. Students who feel there is an error in their clinical grade may request a review of their summary evaluation with the Course Chair to better understand the grade assigned. This request must be submitted in writing to the Course Chair within 14 days of grade submission.  Edits to the summative evaluations will be limited to errors such as incorrect name or pronouns, grammar, etc.  Clerkship Chairs do not add or delete comments from the MSPE section of the summative evaluation once submitted to the Dean’s Office.  Grades may not be revised by completing additional work with the exception of an incomplete. 
  8. Clinical Experiences in Fourth Year that are Pass/Fail

    • (8.1) The following courses are graded Pass/Fail: Global Health, Research, Special Electives and 100 level non-clinical electives.  The transcript will indicate a grade of P  (Pass) or F (Fail). 
    • (8.2) Students on away electives may be evaluated with the host institution’s evaluation system or with the DGSOM Elective Evaluation Form. The DGSOM transcript will report the grade as P or F.  The MSPE will include the evaluation narrative if submitted by the deadline for evaluations to be included in the MSPE. 

Approved by MEC in March 2022; Updated by Educational Affairs in August 2023

Appendix

Archive

Purpose

The purpose of this section is to provide an overview of the policies and procedures used to collect medical student evaluations of faculty, courses, clerkships, electives, and other educational activities. It highlights the responsibility of the David Geffen School of Medicine and individual medical students to ensure that appropriate feedback is gathered.

Overview

Collecting student evaluations of the medical school curriculum and instruction are crucial to obtaining feedback that can be used to ensure:

  • The School of Medicine gathers evidence of faculty teaching ability and shares teaching evaluations with faculty
  • Continuous quality improvement of the curriculum and instruction that is backed by empirical data
  • Compliance with LCME standards and elements
  • Deans, faculty, and staff have reliable student feedback to inform decision-making and strategic planning

Responsibility of the Educational Measurement Unit

The Educational Measurement Unit is responsible for designing and administering evaluations of courses and faculty for all four years of the medical school curriculum. The Educational Measurement Unit is tasked with implementing evaluations that are:

  • Based on sound and rigorous methods, including online surveys and in-person qualitative methods
  • Anonymous or confidential to ensure truthful and forthright feedback from students
  • Mindful of student time and commitments
  • Able to provide decision-makers and faculty data to implement continuous quality improvements

Evaluation methods will be standardized across educational components and years to allow longitudinal comparison of results. Evaluations may include one or more of the following:

  • Items required by the LCME and items that allow for benchmarking against national data sets
  • Overall rating of educational components
  • Rating of individual faculty members, instructors, or tutors
  • Open-ended questions

Responsibility of Students

Students are required to complete course, teaching, and site evaluations at all UCLA locations. Confidential online evaluations are distributed to students via email and must be completed in a timely fashion. Students may additionally be required to participate in confidential focus groups or other in-person feedback sessions. Students are asked to provide evaluations and feedback on:

  • Pre-clerkship courses, clerkship rotations, assigned sites, electives, and other educational activities
  • Faculty, instructors, and tutors responsible for all of the above educational activities

Failure to comply with the school’s policy may result in a professionalism concern being placed on the student’s permanent record.

The Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE) is a written transcript of the student’s performance in medical school and is a required component of the residency application. DGSOM prepares MSPEs for all students in their final year of medical school regardless of the student’s residency application plans. MSPEs are prepared in accordance with the AAMC’s guidelines and are released nationwide on a date determined by AAMC and the Electronic Residency Application Service (typically October 1).

The Format of the MSPE

MSPEs include the following:

Noteworthy Characteristics

A brief description of up to three achievements, activities, or other personal information. The student selects which characteristics are included in this section in conjunction with Deans of Student Affairs.

Academic History 

Information on matriculation and expected graduation dates, and if applicable, any extensions in educational program, leaves of absence, required make-up work or medical school/university adverse actions.

Academic Progress
  • Summary of professional performance
  • Summary of pre-clerkship academic performance
  • Core clerkship academic performance including summary evaluation comments from all  MS3 core clerkships
  • Elective rotation academic performance including summary evaluation comments from all MS4 electives completed by the submission deadline based on the nationwide release date of the MSPE.
  • All summary evaluation comments are edited for grammar in the MSPE, but not for content. Requests for revisions to summary comments must be made to the Course Chair who completed the evaluation within two weeks of the date when the evaluation was released.
Summary

A comparative summative assessment of the student’s performance on the clinical clerkships (when possible).

Medical School Information

An appendix that lists information about the DGSOM and composition of the MSPE.

MSPE Sign-Off

All students are required to review their MSPE and correct factual or grammatical errors before it is finalized and sent to residency programs.

MSPE Addendums

At the discretion of the Associate Dean for Student Affairs, an addendum may be added to an MSPE to include additional information as required by the NRMP Match Participation Agreements. An addendum becomes a permanent part of the MSPE.

MSPE Author

The MSPE at DGSOM is co-signed by the Vice Dean for Education and the Associate Dean(s) for Student Affairs.

In the event that you wish to have a different dean write your MSPE or Noteworthy Characteristics, please communicate directly with the Residency Application Counselor in the Student Affairs Office.

Approved by Clarence H. Braddock, III, M.D., MPH,

MACP, Vice Dean for Education, July 2020

Purpose

The purpose of this policy is to inform students about how they can expect to receive feedback about interpersonal, professional, affective, and/or socioemotional non-cognitive skills essential for growth as student physicians.  DGSOM periodically provides students with written feedback to formally document and facilitate communication about a student’s development in these areas.

Policy Statement

Written narrative assessment is to occur when an assessor-student interaction is of sufficient length to permit direct observation and assessment of student behavior reflective of the DGSOM Graduation Competencies (e.g., interpersonal skills, rapport building, teamwork, communication). Narrative assessment is used for formative feedback and may also be factored into a course grade and/or may be included in or inform the content of the MSPE. As with all assessments of student performance, in instances of sustained or severe substandard performance, non-cognitive skills may be reviewed by APC.

Interactions that are likely to permit narrative assessment may include but are not limited to:

  • Problem Based Learning small group sessions
  • Doctoring or Clinical Skills small group sessions
  • Standardized Patient (SP) observations of communication skills or patient-provider interaction
  • Faculty observation during Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE)s
  • Faculty observation of peer collaboration during anatomy, physiology or histopathology small group sessions
  • Faculty observation of participation, discussion and presentation in small group sessions during clerkship
  • Faculty observation of communication with patient, family or inter-professional team during clerkship
  • Faculty observation of humanism, integrity, work ethic, or commitment to learning during clerkship

Examinations and USMLE

  1. Purpose 

    • Ensure integrity of grading and assessment by defining: 

      1. Policies governing computer-based examination administration 

      2. Policies governing Objective Structured Clinical Examination administration 

      3. Process for requesting examination delay 

      4. Process for requesting review of examinations and regrading/rescoring 

      5. Process for required examination retakes 

      6. Process for requesting and receiving exam accommodations  

  2. Definitions 

    • (2a) Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) 
      An Objective Structured Clinical Examination is a performance-based assessment of clinical skills where students demonstrate competence in areas including but not limited to doctor/patient communication, physical examination, medical procedures, and interpretation of labs. 

    • (2b) NBME Examination 
      Multiple choice examination comprised of questions developed by the National Board of Medical Examiners and conducted under the strict exam administration protocols as required by NBME. NBME exams include the Comprehensive Basic Science Subject Exam (CBSE), Customized Assessment Services (CAS) and Core Clerkship NBME specialty specific shelf exams. 

    • (2c) Pitstop Computer Exam 
      Pre-clerkship exam comprised of questions developed by Foundations of Medical Science (FoMS) educators. 

    • (2d) Anatomy Practical 
      Pre-clerkship anatomy practical developed by Foundations of Medical Science (FoMS) educators. 

    • (2e) Clinical Performance Examination Exam (CPX) 
      Standardized patient examination administered during core clerkships. The exam is a standardized patient-based clinical skills assessment. During their Clerkship Year, students are required to complete and pass a Clinical Performance Examination (CPX) which consists of eight clinical cases portrayed by standardized patients. Each case requires a focused work up and is followed by a written exercise. Individual feedback is provided for purposes of improving history taking, physical examination, information sharing, and patient/doctor relationship skills. 

  3. Policies 

    • (3a) General Policy for Exam Administration 
      1. (3a.1) All students are required to take all examinations on the date and time they are scheduled unless they receive a prior exemption via the procedures outlined below. Being unprepared for an exam is not an acceptable excuse for rescheduling an exam. 
      2. (3a.2) Exams will not be offered earlier than the scheduled date of first administration; all rescheduled dates will occur after the initial date of the exam. 
      3. (3a.3) Once an exam is started, the score stands without exception. 
      4. (3a.4) Once an exam is completed, the score stands without exception. 
      5. (3a.5) Students cannot take exams while on leave of absence from the university. 
      6. (3a.6) Students cannot take an NBME Shelf Exam until they have completed that core clinical clerkship. See the Grading Policy for the Clinical Years Course Failure Policy in the Core Clinical Clerkships for further detail. 
      7. (3a.7) Non-emergent requests for rescheduling an exam will be denied. See the Urgent Requests to Reschedule an Exam for more information. 
      8. (3a.8) To receive an exam accommodation, students must meet with the DGSOM Director of Disability Services and receive temporary or full approval. See Documented Disabilities and Exam Accommodations section for full policy. 
    • (3b) Exam Environment 
      1. (3b.1) To ensure optimal student performance and to ensure exam integrity, test proctors are empowered to maintain a quiet, calm exam environment. 
      2. (3b.2) Proctor authority to maintain the optimal exam environment includes but is not limited to: 
        • Removing any student who is disruptive to the exam environment 
        • Delaying exam entry to a student whose behavior is disruptive to the exam environment before the exam begins 
        • Referring a student directly to Student Affairs 
      3. (3b.3) In the event that a student is removed from or delayed entry to an exam, then the following is permitted: 
        • The proctor will offer the student 10 minutes to resolve the disruption. 
        • If the disruptive behavior is resolved within 10 minutes, the student will enter to begin the exam or reenter to resume the exam. 
        • The exam clock will continue to run during the 10 minutes of resolution time. 
        • If the disruptive behavior is not resolved at 10 minutes, the student’s exam is over. 
          • If the student has not yet started the exam, the student will be permitted to take the exam at the predetermined rescheduled date and time. 
          • If the student has already started the exam, Student Affairs and Curricular Affairs, in consultation with the Course Chair, will determine the option for exam outcome on a case-by-case basis. 
      4. (3b.4) Any student who disrupts an exam may receive a professionalism concern report (PCR) and/or be referred to the Academic Performance Committee. 
    • (3c) Exam Tardiness 
      1. (3c.1) Examinations are administered with a specified starting and ending time. Students are required to arrive on time.
      2. (3c.2) Doors to the exam room will close five minutes prior to the start of the exam. 
      3. (3c.3) To minimize disruptions, late-arriving students will be allowed to enter the room 10 minutes after the exam has started. 
      4. (3c.4) After 30 minutes past the posted start time, the late student will not be permitted to enter the exam room, will be considered a no-show to the exam, and will be directed to contact the Student Affairs Office. 
      5. (3c.5) Tardy students may receive a professionalism concern report (PCR) and/or be referred to the Academic Performance Committee. 
      6. (3c.6) No additional time will be given beyond the scheduled end of the exam for tardy students. 
    • (3d) Unapproved Exam Absence 
      1. (3d.1) Students who do not take a scheduled examination and who do not contact an Assistant Dean or Associate Dean for Student Affairs and the Curricular Affairs Office in advance will receive a failing grade on the examination. 
    • (3e) Urgent Requests to Reschedule an Exam 
      DGSOM recognizes circumstances may arise that may preclude a student from sitting for an examination.  
      1. (3e.1) It is the student’s responsibility to notify an Assistant Dean or Associate Dean for Student Affairs, and the Curricular Affairs office, and the clerkship chair or coordinator and fill out the exam absence form if they are unable to sit for an examination for a circumstance outlined in the policy herein. 
      2. (3e.2) Approved rationales for an urgent request to postpone an exam include (but are not limited to the following): 
        • Illness or Injury 
          Any student unable to take an examination due to illness or injury (self or loved one) must provide appropriate documentation confirming the student was unable to take the examination on the scheduled date. For students registered with DGSOM Disability Services, contact Grace Clifford to verify accommodations as appropriate documentation in the event of a disability-related episode. Students not submitting a supporting letter to the Student Affairs Office will be given a failing grade for the missed examination. 
        • Bereavement 
          Students who experience the death of a loved one are permitted to postpone the examination if they choose.  However, students must consult with an Assistant or Associate Dean of Student Affairs as well as the Curricular Affairs Office for approval to postpone their examination. 
        • Other Extenuating Circumstances 
          If there is a significant situation that precludes you from taking an exam on the scheduled date and time, please consult your Associate and/or Assistant Dean as well as the Curricular Affairs Office to discuss options. 
      3. (3e.3) Frequent (>1 per semester) urgent requests to reschedule exams will be reviewed by the APC and may result in requests for additional documentation. 
      4. (3e.4) All exam reschedules must be accompanied by an exam reschedule form for the original exam date. 
      5. (3e.5) All examinations not taken on the scheduled date will need to be remediated on the next scheduled makeup examination date, as determined by the Year 1, Year 2, or Year 3 Academic Performance Committee (APC) as well as the Curricular Affairs Office. 
    • (3f) Religious Observances
      Faculty are asked not to schedule examinations on dates when a religious observance may cause a substantial number of students to be absent. However, there may be conflicts between scheduled examinations and religious observances other than those listed on the medical school’s exam schedules.  
      1. (3f.1) A student must submit a request to the course chair and the Curricular Affairs Office to reschedule the examination according to the applicable procedures in this section. 
    • (3g) Examination Standards 
      DGSOM follows National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) standards for exam delivery. 
      1. (3g.1) The testing environment will be fair, consistent, respectful, and quiet for all students. 
      2. (3g.2) The testing administrator and proctors are responsible for the examination environment, the integrity of the exam, troubleshooting, and implementing back-up testing procedures in the event of a computer or environmental malfunction.  
    • (3h) Exam Room Integrity & Permitted Items 
      1. (3h.1) Items permitted in the examination room (be prepared to show during check-in) 
        • UCLA ID Badge/Photo ID 
        • External mouse 
        • Disposable earplugs 
        • Laptop (certified if required) and laptop charger 
      2. (3h.2) Items not permitted in the examination room 
        • Cellphones or other electronic devices (i.e. smart watches, Fitbit, headphones, etc.) 
        • Laptop cases/sleeves 
        • iPads/tablets 
        • Hats/caps or any headwear (unless for religious purposes) 
        • Food or snacks 
        • Beverages (i.e. coffee, soda, smoothies, etc.). Water is permitted for internal exams, but is not permitted for NBME exams unless students have pre-approved accommodations. 
        • Backpacks 
        • Luggage 
        • Notes 
        • Purses/Bags 
        • Personal Belongings 
        • Outerwear – coats. Any clothing removed during an exam must be removed from the examination environment. removed during an exam must be removed from the examination environment.  
        • Any suspicious item(s) 
        • Smart watches are prohibited under this policy, but analog and simple digital watches are allowed. 
      3. (3h.3) Provided in the exam room (if approved by the course chair) 
        • Scratch paper for internal FoMS exams 
        • Laminated note board and dry erase marker for NBME exams 
    • (3i) Disputing Exam Scoring 
      1. (3i.1) Students who feel there is an error in their exam score may request a review of the grade assigned in writing to the Course Chair within 14 days of grade submission. 
      2. (3i.2) Additional policies and procedures for exam review may be set by individual course chairs. 
      3. (3i.3) Per UCLA Academic Senate regulations, only the course instructor of record has the responsibility and right to determine and assign a final grade. A student who decides to file a grading complaint should provide written documentation to support their claim that a grade was assigned for other than academic reasons. 
    • (3j) Examination Retake Policy 
      1. (3j.1) Students may be required by the Academic Performance Committee to retake an examination where they did not meet the set threshold score. 
      2. (3j.2) Exceptions may be granted by the Academic Performance Committee, Associate Dean for Student Affairs or Associate Dean for Curricular Affairs, consulting with the Course Chair and Curricular Affairs/Student Affairs Office as needed. 
  1. United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Requirements 

    It is the expectation that all DGSOM UCLA medical school graduates be able to practice medicine in California and other states. The curriculum and experiences are designed to give each student the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behavior to be successful in starting a residency and ultimately practicing as a physician. Therefore, it is a requirement of the School of Medicine that students take and pass all relevant components of United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) during medical school. 
    • (1a) All DGSOM students must successfully pass the USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 exams in order to graduate and receive their diploma. 
    • (1b) All students must take the USMLE Step 1 exam prior to being able to start MS4 electives. 
    • (1c) Students must receive passing scores on the USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 exams by the annual deadline for their rank order lists to be verified by DGSOM for participation in the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP).  Without verification by the medical school, students will not be able to move forward in the match process. 
    • (1d) DGSOM students who do not receive passing scores on the USMLE Step 1, and Step 2 exams by the deadline for NRMP rank list verification may still graduate if they take and receive passing scores on these exams by the last day of their terminal semester.   
    • (1e) Students may not take time off during their Pre-clerkship year to prepare for their first attempt of a USMLE examination. 
    • (1f) Students may not take time off during clerkships or drop a core clerkship to prepare for or take their first attempt of a USMLE Step 1 examination or USMLE Step 2 examination. 
    • (1g) Students receiving financial aid are responsible for meeting with the Financial Aid Office to understand the financial ramifications of interrupting their enrollment related to performance on USMLE Exams. 
    • (1h) USMLE Step 1 Failure: 
      1. (1h.1) One Failure 
        First-time failure of the Step 1 exam will result in the Experiencing Academic/Professional Difficulty designation. If a student has started MS4 clinical electives, the student may complete the current elective, but cannot begin any further electives until the Step 1 exam is retaken and passed. Upon confirmation of passing the Step 1 exam, the student may resume the Year 4 curriculum.  
      2. (1h.2) Two Failures 
        Failing the Step 1 exam twice will result in the designation of Academic/Professional Probation. The student may not return to the curriculum until the Step 1 exam is retaken and passed. Students who do not have a passing score within one year of the date they were notified of their failing score on the second attempt to pass USMLE Step 1 will be referred to CASPP for consideration of dismissal from medical school. 
      3. (1h.3) Three Failures 
        Failing the Step 1 exam three times will result in referral to CASPP for consideration of dismissal from medical school. 
    • (1i) USMLE Step 2 Failure: 
      1. (1i.1) One Failure 
        First-time failure of the Step 2 exam will result in the Experiencing Academic/Professional Difficulty designation.   
      2. (1i.2) Two Failures 
        Failing the Step 2 exam twice will result in the designation of Academic/Professional Probation.   
      3. (1i.3) Three Failures 
        Failing the Step 2 exam three times will result in referral to CASPP for consideration of dismissal from medical school. 

Policy Effective October 2020

Archive & Notes

  1. Rescheduling Pre-clerkship Course Exams 

    Requests to reschedule an exam must be submitted using the applicable exam reschedule form. Reschedule dates are pre-established, and the date option(s) for taking the exam will be provided once the exemption has been made. 
    • (1a) Urgent Request 
      Contact an Assistant or Associate Dean for Student Affairs as well as the Curricular Affairs Office as soon as possible prior to the start of the examination. Please include your name and reason for your request. 
      1. (1a.1) Submit an exam reschedule form as soon as possible to the Curricular Affairs Office and Student Affairs Office. 
      2. (1a.2) All exam reschedules must be accompanied by an exam reschedule form for the original exam date. Exam reschedule forms can be found in Gryphon or in MyCourses notices.
    • (1b) Non-Urgent Request 
      Submit an exam reschedule form at least 2 weeks prior to the regularly scheduled exam date. The reasons for the request must be indicated and supporting documentation may be requested prior to approval. Approval is not assured until an Associate Dean or their designee has signed the form. 
      1. (1b.1) All exam reschedules must be accompanied by an excused absence form for the original exam date. 
  2. Approved Request to Reschedule Course Exam 

    • (2a) The Curricular Affairs Office will notify course chairs and proctors upon approval. 
    • (2b) The student is prohibited from viewing the answer key or discussing the exam or its contents with other students or faculty
    • (2c) It is the student’s responsibility to be certain the rescheduled exam time does not conflict with any of their educational responsibilities. 
    • (2d) Rescheduled exam dates, times, and locations are established by the Medical School and will not be modified to suit individual student needs. 
    • (2e) The student is expected to take the exam on the specified rescheduled exam date. Failure to do so will result in a zero score for the exam unless prior approval is obtained from the Curricular Affairs Office and Student Affairs Office. 
  3. Clinical Course Test Release Policy from Clinical Service 

    • (3a) This policy applies to all students taking Clerkship course assessments including NBME exams. Students will be released from all clinical obligations as follows: 
      1. (3a.1) Students across all sites will be given the Thursday before the exam off. 
      2. (3a.2) For Friday exams, students can be scheduled to take call until 10:00pm on Wednesday night. 
      3. (3a.3) For Thursday exams, students can be scheduled to take call until 10:00pm on Tuesday night. 
  4. Documented Disabilities and Exam Accommodations 

    • (4a) In advance of the assigned exam date, students with disabilities requiring exam accommodations must complete the registration process with the DGSOM Director of Disability Services, Grace Clifford, and receive temporary or full approval

      1. (4a.1) Accommodations should be requested as soon as possible. It may take up to two weeks to complete the exam accommodation application review process, including intake with DGSOM Disability Services. Requests made less than two weeks prior to an exam will be considered but cannot be guaranteed. Accommodations are not retroactive.  

    • (4b) The National Board of Medical Examiners has a separate NBME exam accommodations process. It is recommended students familiarize themselves with the USMLE Exam Accommodation Process: https://www.usmle.org/step-exams/test-accommodations

      1. (4b.1) The DGSOM Director of Disability Services can assist students in reviewing the USMLE Step Accommodation request process and support the development of a strong request. This includes reviewing required documentation, consulting with documenting providers, assisting with the development of the personal statement, and providing a supplemental letter of support. However, such requests should be made minimally 6-9 months in advance of the desired test date as the NBME requires 60-90 days to review and respond to requests. Requests for support made in less than 6-9 months will be considered, but not guaranteed. Minimally, all requests will receive a completed certification of prior test accommodations. 

Pre-Clerkship Workload

  1. Purpose

    • In order to ensure a manageable workload and adequate time for self-directed and independent study during the pre-clerkship phase, this policy outlines the time expectations for in-class and out-of-class activities.
  2. LCME Standard: Monitoring Student Time
    • (1a) ​​​​​​​LCME Standard 8.8 
      The medical school faculty committee responsible for the medical curriculum and the program’s administration and leadership ensure the development and implementation of effective policies and procedures regarding the amount of time medical students spend in required activities, including the total number of hours medical students are required to spend in clinical and educational activities during clerkships.
  3. Policy
    • ​​​​​​​(2a) Overview
      1. ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​(2a.1) DGSOM aims to build foundational knowledge while fostering lifelong learning in students by combining in-class activities supplemented by guided self-directed learning opportunities.
      2. (2a.2) The pre-clerkship faculty and staff ensure a manageable workload by monitoring the weekly required coursework as well as the time that students are expected to spend mastering the curricular material.
      3. (2a.3) The Course and Theme Chairs work together in adjusting required activities and assignments in order to avoid exceeding the time expectations for curricular activities. These activities are regularly reassessed and adjusted based on evaluation data and student feedback.
      4. (2a.4) This policy is reviewed annually to ensure adherence.
    • (2b) Contact Hours for Foundations of Medical Science (FoMS) Courses
      1. ​​​​​​​(2b.1) Estimated total workload for each course block in the pre-clerkship curriculum should not exceed 60 hours per week on average.
      2. (2b.2) Total workload hours include all scheduled in-class activities, required out-of-class activities, and an estimate of the time needed to achieve learning goals each week and on exams.
      3. (2b.3) The following formula should be used for calculating workload: all activities (in- and out-of-class) with the exception of EACE, review sessions, games or grand finales, should be multiplied by 2 to provide an estimate of total time needed to invest in mastering the material. Add in time for assigned Self-Assessments (1 hour per week). Exam weeks should include study time at 3x length of exam. For example, at least 3 hours of study time should be allotted for a 1-hour examination.
  4. Procedures
    • ​​​​​​​(3a) Overview
      1. ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​(3a.1) For each block, the chairs working with curricular affairs staff will be responsible for tracking weekly workload estimates across all elements and adjusting so as not to exceed 60 hours.
      2. (3a.2) Workload hours will be discussed as part of the annual course evaluation process.
      3. (3a.3) Student perceptions of workload will be monitored in feedback sessions with Students, Course Chairs or Directors, Curricular Affairs Leadership and the Educational Measurement Unit. These comparisons will help assess efficacy and appropriateness of policy.
      4. (3a.4) Workload calculations do not include curricular time expected for students in special tracks (e.g. PRIME, MSTP). Communication with program directors and awareness of the medical school curriculum plan is important to ensure overall expectations of these students are reasonable. Overall workload for any student in a special track is not to exceed 80 hours per week.
      5. (3a.5) Students are encouraged to thoroughly review DGSOM Technical Standards. Any student with an existing disability, or who develops a disability (permanent or temporary), and wishes to seek an accommodation must notify the Director for DGSOM Disability Services (an extension of the UCLA Center for Accessible Education) in writing via the private online application process. The UCLA Center for Accessible Education will consult with the School of Medicine to notify them of a student’s request and recommended accommodations. For more information about DGSOM Disability Services, review their webpage.  

Accountable Dean: Assistant Dean for Pre-Clerkship Curriculum/Associate Dean for Curriculum
Approved by Medical Education Committee February 2024

Requesting an Alternative Site or Team

Initial site assignments are made via an electronic scheduling lottery based on student preferences.

Following this process, students have the ability to formally request an alternative clerkship site. Requests will be reviewed by the clerkship and Dean’s Office leadership, as needed.

Criteria for Consideration of Reassignment

  • Reassignment related to learning environment concerns
  • Reassignment related to a duality of interest
  • Reassignment is based on academic accommodation for a documented disability (upon recommendation by the UCLA Center for Accessible Education).
  • Reassignment related to personal circumstances 
  • Reassignment related to rotating at a Covered Affiliate

Procedure for requesting an alternative clerkship site

  • The student should waitlist the requested alternative site in the scheduling system at least 30 days prior to the start of the clerkship.
  • The Clerkship Scheduling Coordinator in Student Affairs will automatically receive notification of the request which will be indicated on the student’s schedule. 

Procedure for requesting an alternative clerkship site less than 30 days from the start of the clerkship, or during the clerkship

  • Send an email message to the Clerkship Scheduling Coordinator in Student Affairs, and an Assistant/ Associate Dean for Student Affairs with your request.
  • The following information should be included in your communication:
    • Current clerkship and site
    • Proposed clerkship site
    • Justification for the request

All requests for alternative clerkship sites will be considered, although it may not be possible to accommodate all requests.

The Clerkship Coordinator in Student Affairs will evaluate requests submitted 30 days prior to the start of the clerkship while considering each clerkship site’s minimum and maximum enrollment limits.

Requests submitted less than 30 days from the start of the clerkship will be evaluated by one of the Assistant or Associate Deans for Student Affairs before final approval from the Clerkship Chair and the Assistant or Associate Dean for Curricular Affairs.

Note that in addition to considering a change in clerkship site based upon a student’s request, all site assignments are subject to change. The Clerkship Chair, Associate Dean for Student Affairs, Associate Dean for Curricular Affairs, or Assistant Dean for Curricular Affairs may initiate a change in clerkship site assignment in response to student, resident, or faculty feedback, to help ensure that a student has adequate exposure to required clinical experiences for the clerkship, or based on the availability of sites. 

One of the very important skills the students should develop during their clinical rotations is learning to work with diverse teams of people with different personalities and varying problem-solving skills. On services with multiple teams, should there be a significant reason necessitating reassignment to a different team, students have the ability to formally request a reassignment. These requests will be reviewed and considered by the Clerkship Site Director, Clerkship Chair, and Dean’s Office.

Procedure for requesting an alternative team assignment

  • Send an email message to the Clerkship Site Director, Site Coordinator, and Clerkship Chair with a copy to your Assistant and/or Associate Dean for Student Affairs.
  • Include in your message details about your current team assignment, and the reasons for requesting reassignment to another team.

General Policies

Communication and Computing

Because of our reliance on technology in our curriculum and day-to-day communication, all medical students at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA are required to:

  • Use the UCLA Mednet email account as their official email account for the School of Medicine for all official business with faculty and staff as it is secure, verifiable, and protects the transmission of sensitive information.
  • Access your Mednet email account daily for timely communication. Communication from non-Mednet accounts (BOL, gmail, or other personal accounts) will not be accepted as they are not secure or verifiable.

Why the Mednet Email Account?

DGSOM medical students receive Mednet accounts as they start their first year. To be eligible to receive a Mednet account, accepted students must complete the Mednet Accounts for Entering Medical Students Secret Word Submission form on the Accepted Student Checklist. Information about new accounts will be emailed. These requirements are in addition to UCLA and University of California Policies regarding the use of email and other IT Policies.

Because you will be working with patients throughout your four years, it is important that all email communications that might contain patient information be secure. All emails between Mednet email users stay within the secure Mednet system. This is why you cannot forward your Mednet emails to any non-Mednet email systems.

Student access to Mednet accounts will be disabled upon graduation.

Purpose

Digital and social media have profound effects on the way we communicate, and technology has become essential to the way we serve the needs of our patients and communities. DGSOM encourages the appropriate use of digital and social media as a means of increasing awareness of DGSOM activities, enhancing community relationships, advancing knowledge of education and research, and otherwise engaging in work-related communications. It is imperative that DGSOM Workforce members who participate and actively engage online understand their responsibilities when using these tools to communicate. This policy provides direction to DGSOM workforce members about creating, approving, and managing digital and social media accounts. This policy also outlines the DGSOM Marketing and Communications Office’s role in supporting the creation and use of digital and social media accounts that use the UCLA brand and logos. The provisions of this policy should not be construed to interfere with any rights protected under state, federal, or local law, including a workforce member’s right to discuss or engage in digital and social media activities relating to the terms and conditions of employment or raising good faith workplace concerns.

Related Policies

The following policies may also be applicable to a workforce member’s digital and social media activities:

Scope

This policy applies to all staff members, faculty, students, trainees and volunteers of the research and education enterprises at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. This policy includes digital and social media activities during work and non-work time, as well as activities conducted on work and non-work systems, consistent with applicable law.

Definitions

For purposes of this policy, digital and social media are defined as any form of electronic communication through which the user creates online communications designed to share information, ideas, pictures, videos, personal messages and any other user-generated content.  Digital and social media include but are not limited to text, audio, video, images, podcasts, webpages and other multimedia content. This policy applies to all forms of social media and will continue to evolve as new digital technologies and social media sites emerge. 

Policy

DGSOM entities, faculty, staff, and students who have, or wish to have, a DGSOM-branded social media account or who plan to create one should inform the UCLA David Geffen IT (DGIT) Web Product Manager.

The DGIT web team can offer guidance and assistance to individuals and units who are using or considering using social media as a professional communications tool.

The DGSOM at UCLA recommends the following steps be taken prior to creation of a DGSOM-branded social media account:

  • Obtain approval from a supervisor, entity-executive leadership (i.e. department chair, division chief, manager, etc.).
  • Designate a content owner and back-up moderator who are responsible for monitoring and maintaining accurate content. The primary content owner should have at least 0.25 FTE dedicated to social media management.
Content Owners 
  • Content owners are responsible for maintaining compliance with DGSOM policies concerning patient privacy, HIPAA, and conflict of interest, DGSOM branding, and related policies
  • Content owners must obtain signed, HIPAA authorization forms before posting or sharing any protected health information (PHI). Content owners are prohibited from posting or sharing any PHI regardless of where it was first posted (i.e. external media site), without proper written authorization.
  • Content owners are responsible for ensuring content is current, accurate, and respects copyrights and disclosures. Proprietary financial, intellectual property, patient care, or similar sensitive or private content cannot be published.
  • Content owners are responsible for gaining the express consent of all involved parties for the right to distribute or publicize recordings, photos, images, video, text, slideshow presentations or artwork.
  • Content owners must actively monitor postings.
  • The department owner must have access and the ability to login to their account. DGIT must have administrative access and login information to all university “official” business-related social media accounts by way of administrative platforms of the social network or technology (such as LastPass) where applicable. Workforce members who maintain this information must make it available to the department owner or DGIT at the end of employment.
Content Suspension

DGSOM reserves the right to suspend the use of, or modify content on, DGSOM-sponsored digital and social media sites within University policy and applicable law.

Timekeeping

DGSOM workforce members who are responsible for monitoring and updating sites must comply with policies and collective bargaining agreements regarding time reporting.

Digital and Social Media and Recruiting

DGSOM uses digital and social media to drive brand awareness and assist in talent acquisition efforts. The use of social media in the recruiting process is limited to, and should only be conducted by, Human Resources Planning and Talent Acquisition.

If workforce members have any questions about the policy’s expectations or individual responsibilities, please contact DGSOM Digital Marketing.

Email: DeansOfficeDigital@mednet.ucla.edu

All medical students at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA must own an encrypted laptop and mobile device that meet requirements specified on the DGIT website.

Computing Requirements

To use any device for University business, it must satisfy all the security requirements and standards of both the University and UCLA Health. Devices that cannot meet these requirements are not suitable for University work and are not permitted to access or store any University data.  Please go to the following web site for more information about products and support provided by DGIT - Digital Technology, including information about AirWatch for mobile devices, computer encryption, MFA and more. 

 

Confidentiality

Applies to all UCLA Health “workforce members” including:

  • employees, medical staff, and other health care professionals
  • volunteers; agency, temporary, and registry personnel; and trainees, house staff, students, and interns (regardless of whether they are UCLA trainees or rotating through UCLA Health facilities from another institution).

It is the responsibility of all UCLA Health workforce members, as defined above, including employees, medical staff, house staff, students and volunteers, to preserve and protect confidential patient, employee and business information.

The federal Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act (the “Privacy Rule”), the Confidentiality of Medical Information Act (California Civil Code § 56 et seq.) and the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act (California Welfare & Institutions Code § 5000 et seq.) govern the release of patient identifiable information by hospitals and other health care providers. The State Information Practices Act (California Civil Code sections 1798 et seq.) governs the acquisition and use of data that pertains to individuals. All of these laws establish protections to preserve the confidentiality of various medical and personal information and specify that such information may not be disclosed except as authorized by law or the patient or individual.

Confidential Patient Care Information includes: Any individually identifiable information in possession or derived from a provider of health care regarding a patient's medical history, mental, or physical condition or treatment, as well as the patients and/or their family members records, test results, conversations, research records and financial information. (Note: this information is defined in the Privacy Rule as “protected health information.”)

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Physical medical and psychiatric records including paper, photo, video, diagnostic and therapeutic reports, laboratory and pathology samples;
  • Patient insurance and billing records;
  • Mainframe and department based computerized patient data and alphanumeric radio pager messages;
  • Visual observation of patients receiving medical care or accessing services; and
  • Verbal information provided by or about a patient.

Confidential Employee and Business Information includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Employee home telephone number and address;
  • Spouse or other relative names;
  • Social Security number or income tax withholding records;
  • Information related to evaluation of performance;
  • Other such information obtained from the University’s records which if disclosed, would constitute an unwarranted invasion of privacy; or
  • Disclosure of Confidential business information that would cause harm to UCLA Health.
  • Peer review and risk management activities and information are protected under California Evidence Code section 1157 and the attorney-client privilege.

I understand and I acknowledge that:

  • I shall respect and maintain the confidentiality of all discussions, deliberations, patient care records and any other information generated in connection with individual patient care, risk management and/or peer review activities.
  • It is my legal and ethical responsibility to protect the privacy, confidentiality and security of all medical records, proprietary information and other confidential information relating to UCLA Health and its affiliates, including business, employment and medical information relating to our patients, members, employees and health care providers.
  • I shall only access or disseminate patient care information in the performance of my assigned duties and where required by or permitted by law, and in a manner which is consistent with officially adopted policies of UCLA Health, or where no officially adopted policy exists, only with the express approval of my supervisor or designee. I shall make no voluntary disclosure of any discussion, deliberations, patient care records or any other patient care, peer review or risk management information, except to persons authorized to receive it in the conduct of UCLA Health affairs.
  • UCLA Health Administration performs audits and reviews patient records in order to identify inappropriate access.
  • My user ID is recorded when I access electronic records and that I am the only one authorized to use my user ID. Use of my user ID is my responsibility whether by me or anyone else. I will only access the minimum necessary information to satisfy my job role or the need of the request.
  • I agree to discuss confidential information only in the work place and only for job related purposes and to not discuss such information outside of the work place or within hearing of other people who do not have a need to know about the information.
  • I understand that any and all references to HIV testing, such as any clinical test or laboratory test used to identify HIV, a component of HIV, or antibodies or antigens to HIV, are specifically protected under law and unauthorized release of confidential information may make me subject to legal and/or disciplinary action.
  • I understand that the law specially protects psychiatric and drug abuse records, and that unauthorized release of such information may make me subject to legal and/or disciplinary action.
  • My obligation to safeguard patient confidentiality continues after my graduation from The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

Copyright

Please note that all lectures are available in electronic formats to enrolled students as an aid to better understand the course material. All materials, both electronic and hard print, are copyrighted by DGSOM. As a condition of accessing these files and information, you agree not to share them with anyone outside of the course without explicit permission from the instructor who delivered the lecture. Your adherence to this policy is part of the professional behavior expected of you. Infringements are a violation of policy and will be considered violations of the honor code and academic policy. This may result in a Professionalism Concern Reporting Form or administrative action. 

Geffen Hall

Building Access and Limited Access During Off Hours – Geffen Hall

PURPOSE

To provide a safe and secure environment for DGSOM students, faculty, and staff to pursue academic, administrative, and support activities.

POLICY

General Access

  • The Geffen Hall complex will have general access Monday through Friday from 6 am to 7 pm (excluding holidays).
  • The gates on the B level (from Le Conte) and 1st floor (from Switzer Plaza) will be open during this time.
  • Faculty, staff, and students are asked to wear their UCLA ID Badges on the upper third of their body and ensure it is visible.
  • Restricted areas will have proximity control settings and access will only be provided with authorization.

Night, Weekend, and Holiday Access

  • During nights (7 pm to 6 am), weekends, and holidays, Geffen Hall will be accessible via proximity card access only to DGSOM faculty, staff, and students with approved authorization.
  • The 3rd and 4th floors will be off limits except to those building occupants who have offices on these floors.

Visitors/Guests

  • During general access hours, all visitors and guests must be escorted by their faculty/staff/student host or sign in at the B Level Security Desk where they must show identification and receive a visitor’s badge.
  • During nights, weekends, and holidays, a maximum of two guests per host is allowed. Guests must be signed in by security at the B Level Security Desk. Visitor passes will be provided by the security officer after guests sign in and show appropriate identification. If the officer is on patrol throughout the building, hosts should contact 310-267-7100 to ask for assistance.

Special Events and Meetings

  • Special events and meetings including outside guests need to be pre-approved by the Dean’s Office. Guest lists must be provided and security will check guests in via a single point of access.

Security Posts and Rounding

  • Security will be posted at the B Level Security Desk during general access hours. Officers may leave post to respond to specific requests for service in Geffen Hall or for emergencies.
  • At 7 pm, security will lock perimeter gates and ensure that all doors are secured. At 6 am (weekdays), the gates will be re-opened.
  • Security will conduct patrols and rounds of the building (internally and externally) from 7 pm to 6 am daily. During these rounds, faculty, staff, and students should present identification when asked. Security will escort individuals out of the building if proper identification is not provided.

General Building Policies

  • The building is to be used to support DGSOM faculty, staff, and student education and administration. All occupants and visitors should ensure that their behavior is consistent with this mission and does not negatively impact other occupants.
  • Occupants should ensure that all areas they use, including common areas, are cleaned and straightened when they depart the area. This includes ensuring that trash and recycling are disposed of in appropriate bins and furniture is reset to its appropriate place.
  • Bathing is prohibited in Geffen Hall bathrooms.
  • The Student Lounge is for the exclusive use of DGSOM students (and approved faculty and staff for administrative purposes). Guests are not permitted in the Student Lounge.
  • Alcohol is not permitted in the building unless pre-approved by the Dean’s Office for special events.
  • Sleeping and sexual behavior are not permitted.
  • Requests to use Geffen Hall for special events or events outside of curricula must be submitted for approval by the Dean’s Office via Assistant Dean Joyce Fried.
  • Proximity card access is established via requests to Health Sciences Security (proxcardaccess@mednet.ucla.edu) by an authorized requestor. The request should include the name of the occupant, their University ID number, and 5- or 6-digit proximity card number (on the back of the BruinCard ID). Authorized requestors are approved through the Dean’s Office.
  • Individuals who are found in the building without appropriate identification, in unauthorized areas, or engaging in inappropriate behavior will be escorted out of the complex by security personnel.
  • Riding bicycles, skateboards, scooters, and hoverboards within the building is prohibited.

Room Schedules

  • Unlocked from 6 am to 7 pm
    • All Standard Classrooms
    • B-09, B-11, B-13, B-15
    • A-01, A-04, A-06, A-09, A-11, A-13, A-15, A-17
    • 102, 104, 106, 108, 115, 117, 119, 121, 144, 146, 152, 154, 156
  • Unlocked from 8 am to 5 pm o Conference Rooms
    • 112, 113, 122
    • 207, 210, 213
    • 309, 311 o
  • Special Classrooms
    • 148, 150 (with extended access for students)

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Federal regulations require that all students receiving financial aid from Title IV funds maintain satisfactory academic progress. To comply with this requirement the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA (DGSOM) has adopted a Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy that applies to all medical students receiving financial aid.  Students who fail to meet the satisfactory academic progress requirements become ineligible to receive Title IV (Federal loans) and institutional aid (DGSOM scholarships and loans) until they are in compliance with these requirements. If you need to appeal, please see the 2022 -2023 SAP appeal form.

Note: Satisfactory Academic Progress is not equivalent to the category of "Good Academic/Professional Standing."  The designation of Satisfactory Academic Progress is defined in the SAP Policy (linked above), and may apply to students who are placed in the category of "Academic/Professional Probation." 

SAP policy

Technical Non-Academic Standards

Essential Abilities and Characteristics Required for Completion of the MD Degree

INTRODUCTION

The School of Medicine intends for its graduates to become competent and compassionate physicians who are capable of pursing and completing residency, passing licensing exams and obtaining and maintaining medical licensure. Thus, all matriculants are expected to achieve competence in the full curriculum required by the faculty. Essential abilities and characteristics required for completion of the MD degree consist of certain minimum physical, cognitive, mental, and emotional abilities to assure that candidates for admission, promotion, and graduation can participate fully in all aspects of medical training with or without reasonable accommodation. DGSOM is committed to diversity and to attracting and educating students who will make the population of healthcare professionals’ representative of the national population. Diversity enriches the educational and clinic settings and informs the quality of care we provide to patients and their families. Therefore, we welcome the diverse experiences of learners with unique lived experience. 

Technical Standards

The essential abilities and characteristics described herein are also referred to as technical (or non-academic) standards. They are described below in several broad categories including observation; communication; motor; intellectual, conceptual, integral, integrative, and quantitative abilities; and social and behavioral skills. 

Delineation of technical standards is required for the accreditation of U.S. medical schools by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education.  The following abilities and characteristics are defined as technical standards, which in conjunction with academic standards established by the faculty, are requirements for admission, promotion, and graduation.

I.             OBSERVATION:     Candidates must be able to obtain information from demonstrations and experiments in the basic sciences and participate in experiments of science, including but not limited to such things as dissection of cadavers; examination of specimens in anatomy, pathology, and neuroanatomy laboratories; and microscopic study of microorganisms and tissues in normal and pathologic states. Candidates should be able to assess a patient and evaluate findings accurately. 

II.            COMMUNICATION:    Candidates must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently with patients, their families, and members of the health care team.  They must be able to obtain a medical history in a timely fashion, interpret non-verbal aspects of communication, and establish therapeutic relationships with patients.  Candidates must be able to record information accurately and clearly; and communicate effectively with other health care professionals in a variety of patient settings.

III.          MOTOR FUNCTION:    Candidates must possess the capacity to learn to perform physical examinations and diagnostic maneuvers. Students should be able to execute some motor movements required to provide general care to patients and provide or direct the provision of emergency treatment of patients. Such actions require some coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements balance and equilibrium.

IV.          INTELLECTUAL, CONCEPTUAL, INTEGRAL, INTEGRATIVE, AND QUANTITATIVE ABILITIES: Candidates must have sufficient cognitive (mental) abilities and effective learning techniques to synthesize the detailed and complex information presented in the medical student curriculum.  They must be able to learn through a variety of modalities including, but not limited to, classroom instruction; small group, team, and collaborative activities; individual study; preparation and presentation of reports; and use of computer and information technology.   Candidates must be able to memorize, measure, calculate, reason, analyze, synthesize, and transmit information by multiple methods.  They must recognize and draw conclusions about three-dimensional spatial relationships and logical sequential relationships among events. They must be able to formulate and test hypotheses that enable effective and timely problem-solving in diagnosis and treatment of patients in a variety of clinical settings.

V.            BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL ATTRIBUTES:  Candidates should possess the emotional health required for full utilization of their intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibility’s attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients, and the development of mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients, family members, fellow students, faculty, and staff. They should be able to adapt to changing environments, to display flexibility and learn to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of many patients. Candidates must be able to contribute to collaborative, constructive learning environments; accept constructive feedback from others; and take personal responsibility for making appropriate positive changes. They must adhere to universal precaution measures and meet safety standards applicable to inpatient and outpatient settings and other clinical activities. Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, professionalism, interest, and motivation are all personal qualities that are expected during the education processes.

VI:          ETHICAL AND LEGAL STANDARDS: Candidates should maintain and display ethical behaviors commensurate with the role of a physician in all interactions with patients, faculty, staff, students, and the public. Candidates are expected to understand the legal and ethical aspects of the practice of medicine and function within the law and ethical standards of the medical profession.

Reasonable Accommodation

DGSOM is committed to excellence in accessibility and encourages students with disabilities to disclose and seek accommodations. The technical standards are not intended to deter any candidate for whom reasonable accommodation will allow the fulfillment of the complete curriculum.  Students who, after review of the technical standards, determine that they require reasonable accommodation to fully engage in the program should contact DGSOM Disability Services to confidentially discuss their accommodations needs. Given the clinical nature of our programs, time may be needed to create and implement the accommodations. Accommodations are never retroactive; therefore, timely requests are essential and encouraged.

Required Disclosures of Arrest, Charge, or Conviction

Candidates must meet the legal standards for licensure as specified by the Federation of State Medical Boards. As such, candidates for admission must acknowledge and provide written explanation of any felony or misdemeanor offense(s) action taken against them prior to matriculation at the School of Medicine.  In addition, after matriculation, students must immediately notify the Associate Dean of Students of any arrest, charge, or conviction occurring thereafter. Felony conviction or failure to disclose prior or new offenses can lead to disciplinary action by the school that may include dismissal.

Updated by the DGSOM Faculty Executive Committee April 2024

Transportation

Given the rich network of educational experiences at affiliate hospitals, community clinics, and practices, all students at DGSOM must have reliable transportation.

Absences due to a lack of reliable means of transportation will not be excused. Any student not meeting the above requirement for transportation will be subject to administrative action at the discretion of the Associate Dean for Student Affairs and/or the Committee on Academic Standing, Progress and Promotion.

If you have a documented disability that may be the basis for an accommodation related to this policy, please contact the UCLA Center for Accessible Education. The UCLA Center for Accessible Education (CAE) facilitates academic accommodations for students with documented permanent and temporary disabilities. Accommodations are designed to promote successful engagement in the UCLA academic experience.

Learning Environment Policies

Clinical Supervision

Purpose

To cultivate an environment that maximizes the safety of patients and students and encourages the development and mastery of clinical skills necessary in the care of patients.

Overview

In order to fulfill our dual duties to patient care and safety, to the education of medical students in the practice of medicine, and to align with accreditation requirements (as outlined by the LCME standards 9.2 Faculty Appointments, and 9.3 Clinical Supervision of Medical Students), this policy delineates the requirements to meet the standard for supervision in the clinical environment across all years of undergraduate medical education.

Policy

  • All medical students at DGSOM must be appropriately supervised when participating in patient care in required or elective clinical activities at all clinical training sites.
  • Medical students should not provide clinical care to patients without supervision.
  • Supervisors must either hold a faculty appointment at the David Geffen School of Medicine or be supervised in their teaching role by a physician with a faculty appointment at the David Geffen School of Medicine. Based on this requirement, appropriate supervisors may include physicians, residents, fellows, and other licensed health professional faculty overseeing activities within their scope of practice.
  • Medical student supervision may be categorized as:
    • Direct supervision, in which the supervisor is physically present with the student in the performance of clinical care.
    • Indirect supervision with immediate availability, in which the supervisor is not physically present with the student, but is available immediately if needed.
    • The determination of the appropriate level of supervision is the responsibility of the supervisors, and should be based on multiple factors, including but not limited to:
      • The level of training of the student.
      • Familiarity with the supervisor with the clinical abilities of the student.
      • The acuity of the patient and the level of risk to the patient.
      • The complexity of the clinical activity.
      • Students should not perform any invasive procedures or sensitive examinations, including breast, pelvic and rectal exams, without direct supervision from a supervisor who is qualified to independently perform the given procedure. In addition, UCLA Health has a separate policy that requires the presence of a trained chaperone for all intimate examinations. 

UCLA Medical Chaperone Policy 

Procedure

  • The supervisor reviews and independently verifies all student findings, assessments, and care plans, and documents this review.
  • It is the faculty supervisor’s role to ensure that any non-physicians and physician trainees who are engaged in clinical teaching or the supervision of medical students are acting within their scope of practice and skill level.
  • The Dean’s Office – in partnership with the Clerkship Chairs, Clerkship Site Directors, Chairs for Longitudinal Preceptorship courses in Years 1, 2 and 3, as well as all Year 4 Course Chairs – is responsible for communicating and disseminating policies and procedures related to supervision to faculty, residents, fellows and students who participate in the clinical curriculum, and for monitoring compliance.
  • Students should report concerns regarding inappropriate supervision and any violations of this policy. The multiple forums for reporting include direct reporting to a course chair, clerkship site director, or clerkship chair; direct reporting to the Assistant Dean for Clinical Education; documenting concerns in the course or clerkship evaluations at the end of the course or clerkship, or by established reporting mechanisms monitoring the learning environment.

Approved by MEC May 2019

Covered Affiliates

Working and Training at Affiliated Organizations as a University of California (UC) Trainee Enrolled in a UC-Sponsored Training Program 

UC’s academic health centers and health professional schools have affiliations with other health care organizations to improve quality and access for the people of the state of California, particularly those in medically underserved communities, and to support the University’s education, research, and public service missions.  

Some of these organizations have policies that are different from those of UCLA. For example, some restrict certain evidence-based health care services, such as abortion, contraception, assisted reproductive technologies, gender-affirming care, and end-of-life care, that otherwise would be offered at a UCLA facility or other health care locations that do not have these policies. Organizations that have these policy-based restrictions on care are referred to as “covered affiliates” under Regents Policy 4405 and systemwide policy. 

Expectations for UC Providers 

The University of California is committed to delivering patient-centered, evidence-based, comprehensive medical care that addresses the needs of patients, advances health equity, and is free from discrimination. Accordingly, when UC providers are working or training at any UC or non-UC facility, they are expected to: 

  • Make clinical decisions consistent with the standard of care and their independent professional judgment, respecting each individual patient’s needs and wishes. Trainees are expected to make decisions under the appropriate level of supervision by a licensed clinician as outlined in UCLA school and program supervision policies. 
  • Inform patients of all health care options, regardless of whether those options are available through the covered affiliate, prescribe any interventions that are medically necessary and appropriate, and transfer or refer patients to other facilities when it is in the patient’s interest. 
  • Provide any item or service deemed necessary and appropriate in the event of an emergency, without restriction, and without seeking approval from any non-licensed health care provider. 

Training at a Covered Location 

Training at an affiliated organization with policy-based restrictions on care is voluntary, and if a trainee has an objection, the UCLA program or school will try to identify an alternative site. 

Medical residents and fellows must complete all educational and clinical experiences that are required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the American Board of Medical Specialties, the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine and the UCLA residency or fellowship program in order to successfully complete the training program and be eligible for specialty board certification. Medical students must satisfactorily complete all educational and clinical activities that are required by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) and the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine to successfully attain their medical degrees. Likewise, trainees in other health professions, must also comply with all requirements outlined by their UC schools and pertinent accrediting agencies. 
 

If a medical student objects to training at a site because of the policy-based restrictions as described in this policy, the medical student must formally submit this objection with a detailed explanation in writing to the Associate Dean for Curricular Affairs, Dr. Jason Napolitano, JNapolitano@mednet.ucla.edu, within 15 days of receiving this policy.   

If a sponsoring location receives a trainee objection, it will attempt to identify alternative sites with the necessary faculty, resources and clinical/educational experiences to comply with applicable accreditation standards, specialty board and institutional requirements while maintaining a consistent training experience for all UC trainees and consistent program funding. If an alternative site is found with which a training agreement has been or can be established consistent with UC policy and requirements, the trainee will be reassigned to the alternative site. If an alternative site is not found, the designated institutional official will inform the trainee and the relevant Dean. The trainee will be given the option to train at that covered affiliate site, or to find another program if possible. 

Covered Affiliate Policies 

Covered affiliates may ask for confirmation of adherence to their policies while working or training at their facilities. However, the major private, non-profit health systems in California with policy-based restrictions have acknowledged in their agreements with the University that all UC personnel and trainees working or training at their facilities shall at all times have the right and ability to: (i) make clinical decisions consistent with the standard of care and their independent professional judgment, respecting the needs and wishes of each individual patient; (ii) inform patients of all of their health care options; (iii) prescribe any interventions that are medically necessary and appropriate; (iv) transfer or refer patients to other facilities whenever they determine it is in the patient’s interests; and (v) provide any item or service they deem in their professional judgment to be necessary and appropriate to treat a patient’s emergency medical condition, without application of policy-based restrictions on care, and without seeking approval from any non-provider.   

Government-Operated Facilities 

In addition to these organizations, many government-operated facilities are prohibited by federal law from performing certain services and have adopted policies implementing those laws. These facilities also have confirmed that they expect their medical staff and personnel providing services at their clinical sites to make clinical decisions consistent with the standard of care and their independent professional judgment, considering the needs and wishes of each individual patient. As with all UC-sponsored training programs, trainees are expected to make decisions under the appropriate level of supervision by a licensed clinician as outlined in the local UCLA school and program supervision policies.  

 These government-operated organizations have verified that they comply with federal anti-discrimination laws and that they do not bar advising, prescribing, or referring patients, nor do they bar performing emergency services.  

Covered Affiliates 

UCLA has identified the following covered affiliates that have care-restricting policies. This list is not exhaustive and may change over time based on the policies of these organizations or the addition of new agreements with other health care organizations 

  • Providence Health 
  • Adventist Health 
  • Dignity Health 
  • Loma Linda University 
  • QueensCare Health Centers 
  • Mary Health of the Sick 

 Sharing Concerns or Complaints 

The University expects that UC employees and trainees will deliver evidence-based health care services and, in those locations where a required service cannot be delivered, appropriate referrals or transfers must be made. If at any time a UC employee or trainee is asked to do otherwise, or a patient has a complaint or grievance related to care received or provided through covered affiliates, the University should be immediately informed as described below. 

If patients have any concerns or complaints about care received at a covered affiliate’s location, they may contact UCLA’s Office of Patient Experience at 310-267-9113.  

If UC employees or trainees believe their professional judgment or freedom to counsel, prescribe, refer, transfer, or provide emergency care has in any way been impeded at a covered affiliate’s facility, they should immediately contact: 

If for any reason, patients, UC employees, or UC trainees are unable to reach these points of contact, the following should be contacted:  UCLA Health, Office of Compliance Services, at compoffice@mednet.ucla.edu.  Concerns may also be reported through the University’s Whistleblower Hotline at universityofcalifornia.edu/hotline or (800) 403-4744.  

More information can be found in the full text of the Presidential Policy on Affiliations with Certain Health Care Organizations and of the Regents Policy 4405 Policy on Affiliations with Healthcare Organizations that Have Adopted Policy-Based Restrictions on Care.

Duality of Interest

  • The physician has a primary duty to their patient and is professionally obligated to act in the best interests of their patient.
  • The student has the right to strict confidentiality of their health and medical conditions, including their physical health, their mental health, and the presence of learning disabilities.
  • Faculty and staff are responsible for approaching and working with each student without bias and without favoritism.
  • Faculty and students must recognize that the appearance of a duality of interest may interfere with the learning environment for both the involved student as well as the student’s peers, and must be considered regardless of whether a conflict of interest is truly present.
  • DGSOM Faculty and Staff who are providing or who have provided clinical care for a student must not serve in any academic supervisory role for that student, nor be involved in the academic assessment or promotion of the medical student receiving those services.
  • This policy is not intended to prevent the timely intervention by a qualified clinician in case of a medical emergency.

Medical Student Mistreatment

Purpose

This policy on mistreatment reflects DGSOM’s commitment to maintaining an environment where there is mutual respect between students, teachers, peers, patients, and all members of the education and health care teams. This policy provides definitions and examples of mistreatment, procedures, avenues for reporting, and information about what happens when an incident is reported.

The Association of American Medical Colleges defines mistreatment as behavior that shows disrespect for the dignity of others and unreasonably interferes with the learning process. It can take many forms, and includes any behavior that humiliates, degrades, demeans, intimidates, or threatens an individual or a group. To violate this policy, the behavior should be such that a reasonable person would find that it creates inhospitable working or learning conditions.

Mistreatment can be defined, but is not limited to the following domains:

Physical Mistreatment

Definition: Any behavior that involves physical harm, threat of physical harm or imposition of physical punishment.

Example:

  • Not Mistreatment: A surgeon tells the student not to take the retractor from them unless they ask the student to retract.
  • Mistreatment: Scrub tech hits the student’s arm with a clamp as they are trying to sew because they did not like how the student bumped the Mayo stand.
Abusive expression

Definition: Includes spoken, written, visual, or nonverbal actions directed at another person that are outside the range of commonly accepted expressions of disagreement, disapproval, or critique in an academic culture and professional setting that respects free expression.

Examples: 

  • Not Mistreatment: The student is yelled at to "get out of the way" by a member of the code team as a patient is about to be shocked during resuscitation.
  • Mistreatment: A resident yells at the student for “always getting in the way.”

 

  • Not Mistreatment: An operating room nurse tells the student that they contaminated their gown, and instructs them to rescrub.
  • Mistreatment: A resident makes fun of the student calling them “incompetent” because they do not know how to insert a Foley catheter.

 

  • Not Mistreatment: An attending gives the student feedback on how to improve their performance and it makes the student feel bad because they feel criticized and not appreciated for their efforts.
  • Mistreatment: An attending speaks to the student in public or private in a way with intention to humiliate, “Did you even go to college?” “How did you pass your other rotations?”
Power Abuse

Definition: Includes any abuse of authority or inappropriate actions, threats or retaliation in the exercise of authority, supervision, or guidance. This includes using learner evaluation, grades and potential letters of recommendation as quid pro quo for behaviors.

Examples:

  • Not Mistreatment: The student is in the operating room for the first time and feels timid because they do not know where to stand and what to do.
  • Mistreatment: An attending tells the student not to scrub in on any cases, and says to the other members of the team, “Students always contaminate the field.”

 

  • Not Mistreatment: The student who, after being given clear expectations at the beginning of their obstetrics and gynecology rotation, is asked to leave the operating room because they did not introduce themselves to the patient, read about the patient or prepare for the case.
  • Mistreatment: A resident tells a student that it is their job to write all of the consult notes and progress notes for all patients on the service.

 

  • Not Mistreatment: The student stays in the outpatient clinic late because there are patients that still have not been seen and labs to be followed up on.
  • Mistreatment: The student is expected to work over 80 hours a week, and it is communicated to them that this will be the way to earn an Honors grade on the rotation.

 

  • Not Mistreatment: The student is asked to run down to central supplies to get the necessary equipment to perform a bedside paracentesis.
  • Mistreatment: The student is asked to pick up an attending’s dry cleaning or dinner for the chief resident.

 

  • Not Mistreatment: A resident tells a student that they would like them to review and present a topic to the team as a way to demonstrate their knowledge base and oral presentation skills.
  • Mistreatment: The student is threatened with a failing or lower grade if they do not help the resident write notes.

 

  • Not Mistreatment: The student is assigned duties to help the team provide patient care that do not seem educational to the student (“scut”), including calling an outside hospital to obtain microbiology reports.
  • Mistreatment: The student is assigned duties as punishment rather than education.

 

  • Not Mistreatment: On the first day of third year, a resident says to the student on rotation, “You must be the newbies on service,” then offers to help the students find a computer station.
  • Mistreatment: Students on the team are all given nicknames by the chief resident that are demeaning and culturally inappropriate.
Psychologic Cruelty

Definition: Any malicious behavior that results in psychological pain and suffering.

Examples: 

  • Not Mistreatment: The student’s question is not answered because the attending is concentrating on a critical portion of the procedure. 
  • Mistreatment: The student’s questions are repeatedly ignored by the attending when other learners’ questions are answered.

 

  • Not Mistreatment: The student had to eat lunch alone because the rest of the team was busy with other duties.
  • Mistreatment: The entire team eats lunch together every day but it is made clear that the student is not invited, and is laughed at or ignored when they enter the room.

 

  • Not Mistreatment: The student working with a department chair says he feels nervous about rounding with him/her since they can "make or break" their career.
  • Mistreatment: Resident tells a student that it is their goal to make them cry before the rotation is over.

 

  • Not Mistreatment: A resident incorrectly tells the student the patient’s CXR is normal and when the student reports the result on rounds the attending, who knows otherwise, gets angry at the student.
  • Mistreatment: A resident purposely gives a student misinformation before rounds. Student then overhears the resident laughing with another resident about messing him over.
Sexual Harassment

Definition: Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, unwelcome requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature when a person's submission to such conduct is implicitly or explicitly made the basis for employment decisions, academic evaluation, grades or advancement, or other decisions affecting participation in a University program (quid pro quo), or when such conduct creates a hostile working environment.

Examples 

  • Not Mistreatment: A male student is asked not to go into a room because a female patient only wants a female to examine her.
  • Mistreatment: The student is subjected to offensive sexist remarks or name calling while on call with the team.

 

  • Not Mistreatment: A student is asked by the resident on the team to attend a farewell party at a local bar for the interns leaving the service.
  • Mistreatment: A student is asked by a resident to go out after hours to a bar “so they can discuss the student’s progress on the clerkship”. 
Discrimination

Definition: Any prejudicial treatment on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender, gender expression, gender identity, gender transition status, pregnancy, physical or mental disability, medical condition (cancer-related or genetic characteristics), genetic information (including family medical history), ancestry, marital status, age, sexual orientation, citizenship, or service in the uniformed services, including protected veterans.

Examples:

  • Not Mistreatment: The student is asked to see a specific patient in the clinic because they speak their language.
  • Mistreatment: The student is subjected to racist or ethnically offensive remarks or names about themselves or others, including patients.

 

  • Not Mistreatment: The student is asked to wear a white coat in the clinic and make sure their attire meets professional standards.
  • Mistreatment: The student is subjected to racist or ethnically offensive remarks or names about themselves or others, including patients.

Concern about potential violations of the DGSOM Policy on Medical Student Mistreatment may be handled by communication with various individuals, and students are strongly encouraged to formally report infractions. Options include, but are not limited to the following:

Please note that University employees are mandated reporters and are required to inform the appropriate offices if they become aware that a student may have experienced conduct prohibited by the UC Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment Policy or by the UC Nondiscrimination Policy Statement.

Students should also be aware of confidential resources available to them including:

Occupational Exposures

OCCUPATIONAL RISK TRAINING AND PREVENTION

Participation in direct patient care activities can pose risks to health care professionals, particularly in terms of exposure to infectious diseases. The School of Medicine requires that all medical students participate in annual safety training that facilitates students’ anticipation, recognition, and avoidance of potential occupational risks. The School of Medicine also provides practical training in safe practices so that students minimize risk in potentially hazardous situations, such as in the anatomy laboratory and the operating room, with a particular emphasis placed on strict adherence to universal precautions.

Specific training requirements include:

  • Medical students are required to complete two courses on Worksafe prior to matriculation, and refresher trainings annually:
    • Bloodborne Pathogens
    • Laboratory Safety Fundamentals
  • Prior to working in the Gross Anatomy Laboratory, all students must review two sets of standard operating procedures:
    • What to do in the event of an incident or injury in the laboratory
    • What to do in the event of a spill of cadaver hydrating fluid in the laboratory
  • Before transitioning to clerkships, students must participate in training on an introduction to sterile procedures and personal safety during the clinical years.

In addition to the above training, students are required to show proof of immunity to a series of vaccine-preventable diseases as outlined here:

UCLA Immunization Requirements

Student seeking medical or religious vaccine exemptions should submit the appropriate exemption request form with supporting documentation.

Exception FAQs - UCLA Immunization Requirement

Exception requests are reviewed by the Medical Director at the UCLA Arthur Ashe Student Health Center, and updated manually by Ashe Center Staff in the Medical Clearances section.

Respiratory fit testing is also required annually for all students.

BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS EXPOSURE PROTOCOL FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS AT DGSOM AND UCLA-AFFILIATED SITES

  • Medical students (including visiting students) are covered for emergency and follow-up care after body-fluid exposures that occur in the classroom, clinical, or research settings.
  • When an exposure (e.g., needle-stick injury) occurs, students are to immediately alert their supervisor.
  • Source patient testing should be initiated, if feasible. For exposures that occur at UCLA (including UCLA/Santa Monica), the order requisition and instructions for source testing can be found on the Mednet Forms Portal (Form #10935, Occupational Exposure- Source Patient Requisition).
  • Immediate Care
    • Students rotating at UCLA:
      • The student should go immediately to UCLA Occupational Health during operating hours (Monday-Friday from 7 AM to 4 PM, excluding holidays). Occupational Health is located in room 17-240 CHS, on the first floor and in the main lobby of CHS. No appointment is necessary.
      • If the incident occurs after hours, the student should proceed to the nearest UCLA Emergency Department (Ronald Reagan Medical Center or UCLA Santa Monica Hospital).
    • Students rotating at a remote site:
      • If the site has an Occupational Health or Employee Health office that is open, the student should have their initial evaluation there. Otherwise, the student should go to the nearest Emergency Department.
      • After this initial evaluation, follow-up evaluation and care should occur at UCLA Occupational Health (location details above).
      • The student should obtain results of their baseline lab testing, and if possible, source patient testing (if performed), so that this information is available for follow-up at UCLA Occupational Health.
  • Following exposure, the student should contact their Society Dean, or Dr. Calmes, who in turn will communicate with leadership at Occupational Health so that they are aware of the upcoming follow-up evaluation. If the student cannot reach one of the above deans, or is a visiting student, a call should be made to the medical student emergency line at 310-825-6281 to speak with a dean on call.
  • Medication Prescriptions
    • If HIV postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) is prescribed at any location other than UCLA’s Occupational Health, a starter prescription should be written to cover medications in sufficient quantity until follow-up at UCLA Occupational Health can occur.
    • Prescriptions written at UCLA Occupational Health must be filled at UCLA’s outpatient pharmacy, or at a pharmacy that is able to dispense medications covered under UCLA’s workers’ compensation program.  Prescriptions filled under regular health insurance cannot be reimbursed.
  • Follow-up Care
    • All follow-up care must occur at UCLA Occupational Health, regardless of the location of the incident or the results of the initial evaluation. 
    • Students initially evaluated elsewhere should call UCLA Occupational Health at 310-825-6771 for an appointment to be seen the following business day between 7 AM and 4 PM. Occupational Health is located in room 17-240 CHS, on the first floor and in the main lobby of CHS.
    • Students should notify their Student Affairs dean to be excused from class or clinical duties, if necessary.
  • Billing Issues
    • The cost of the initial evaluation and care is the financial responsibility of the institution at which the exposure occurred. In the event that a student receives a bill for the initial consultation, the student should send bills to UCLA Insurance and Risk Management at wcreports@IRM.ucla.edu.    
    • A claim will be filed with Segdwick Claims Management Services, and they will be asking for your personal information to process the claim (including the student’s social security number)
    • Questions and concerns should be directed to the Workers’ Compensation Program Manager at wcreports@irm.ucla.edu or 310-794-6954.

RESOURCES

Detailed management protocols for exposure to blood-borne infections can be found on the following websites:

PROTOCOL FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS AT DGSOM AND UCLA-AFFILIATED SITES FOR CARE AFTER EXPOSURE TO A PATIENT WITH CONFIRMED ACTIVE PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS, OTHER INFECTIOUS AGENTS, OR ENVIRONMENTAL PATHOGENS

  • This protocol applies to students who are notified that they have come in contact with a patient with active pulmonary tuberculosis and who meet the definition of exposure (e.g., >30 minutes of close contact without a mask).  It does not apply to “TB conversions” after routine annual screening.
  • Notification that you have been exposed may come from the Department of Public Health or from infection control personnel at UCLA or an affiliated training site.
  • If a true exposure is confirmed, call the UCLA Arthur Ashe Student Health and Wellness Center at (310) 825-4073 to make an appointment for baseline and follow-up testing.
  • Please notify your Assistant and/or Associate Dean for Student Affairs, who in turn will communicate with leadership at the UCLA Arthur Ashe Student Health and Wellness Center, so that they are aware of the upcoming evaluation.
  • Outside medical evaluations are not reimbursable.

IMPLICATIONS OF INFECTIOUS AND/OR ENVIRONMENTAL DISEASE OR DISABILITY ON MEDICAL STUDENT EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES

If a medical student develops an infectious and/or environmental disease or related disability after matriculation, whether or not it is a direct result of their training, the medical school will assist the student in completing their MD requirements, as long as the student is able to still meet DGSOM Technical Standards, with or without accommodations.

Students with an infectious or environmental disease requiring medical attention are excused from training duties to seek health care (see relevant sections of Attendance Policies).

Students with infectious and/or environmental disease or related disabilities are encouraged to seek counseling with the UCLA Arthur Ashe Student Health Center or their own medical provider. While California law does not require disclosure of chronic bloodborne viral infections (such as Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and HIV), students with these diseases are highly advised to seek educational and career counseling through the Ashe Center. The Ashe Center will provide counseling to students, including consideration of career options that may be best suited for the student’s disease and/or disability, regardless of insurance through UC SHIP or private insurer.

Students with disabilities may also seek additional information and advice on reasonable accommodations from the Center for Accessible Education (CAE) and from DGSOM’s Disability Services Director, Grace Clifford:

Email: GClifford@mednet.ucla.edu

Work Cell: 424.402.9864 (call or text)

Book an appointment

Depending on the student’s individual needs, a student may be referred to an occupational health, infectious disease, or disability specialist for further consultation.

Students with disabilities should contact the UCLA Center for Accessible Education (CAE) regarding accommodations, if applicable. CAE and the School of Medicine will engage in the interactive process to discuss the provision of reasonable accommodations.

For some conditions, students may need to consult with the Ashe Center or their own medical provider prior to returning to duty. For some conditions, if a reasonable accommodation cannot be identified by CAE, the student may be restricted from participation in some or all educational activities. This restriction may be necessary to protect the health and safety of both patients and other members of the DGSOM community. Because student and patient well-being are of the utmost importance, failure to adhere to these work restrictions is considered a violation of the DGSOM Honor Code (See Professionalism, Honor Code, and Student Conduct).

Contact Information for DGSOM Student Affairs Deans (Box Link)

Professionalism, Honor Code, and Student Conduct

Guiding Principles of Professionalism

Professionalism as a physician begins in medical school, and at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, professionalism is as important as academic performance and is treated as such. Professionalism is grounded in the commitment to maintain patient interests above physician self-interest and to maintain personal, academic, and professional integrity. These commitments are guided by the principles of our Cultural North Star: Do What’s Right, Make Things Better, Be Kind. Our expectations of your professional behavior begin with your first day at DGSOM and include:

  • A commitment to professional excellence
  • Integrity, demonstrating exemplary moral and ethical character
  • Intellectual and academic honesty
  • Respect and compassion for others

Professional Responsibilities and Expectations

As a medical student and future physician, we expect you to demonstrate exceptional professionalism. All students shall adhere to the Honor Code and Code of Conduct for the School of Medicine and the University; however, our expectations of your professional behavior extend beyond these oaths.  The following are our expectations for the demonstration of professional behavior for all students entering the medical profession.  Any violation of these professionalism expectations will be treated seriously. (Please see “Professionalism Concern Process” below.)

Professional Responsibility and Judgment

  • Adhere to the standards of the profession outlined in the ABIM Physician Charter whose fundamental principles are social justice, patient autonomy, and the primacy of patient welfare.
  • Meet all educational, administrative, and clinical responsibilities in a timely fashion (i.e. completion of course evaluations).
  • Continuously seek feedback from supervisors in order to continually improve the educational experience, including the development of knowledge and clinical skills.
  • Recognize limitations and seek help when in situations where expertise, knowledge, or level of experience is inadequate to manage the situation.
  • Contribute to an atmosphere in the classroom, clinical setting, and laboratory that promotes optimal, respectful, and interactive learning.
  • Attend to your physical and emotional well-being, and work to support peers and other members of the community during difficult times in their academic, professional, and personal lives.
  • Refrain from using any substance and/or medication in a manner that may compromise judgment, safety, or the ability to contribute to safe and effective patient care.
  • Maintain attire appropriate for the professional setting.

Honesty, Integrity, and Confidentiality

  • Place patients’ interests and well-being at the center of educational and professional behavior and goals.
  • Treat patient medical records and patient/family communications as confidential and follow compliance and confidentiality guidelines for social media and conversations in public places.
  • Assume responsibility for mistakes made in a mature and honest manner and develop productive strategies for correcting them.
  • Demonstrate academic and scholarly honesty.
  • Provide constructive feedback to others to facilitate ongoing improvement of the curriculum and learning environment.
  • Adhere to DGSOM’s Honor Code, Technical Standards, University policies, and UCLA Student Conduct Code.

Respect and Compassion for Others

  • Be respectful of everyone, including teachers, peers, residents, staff, and patients, with respect to their time, rights, values, religious, ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic backgrounds. There is no tolerance for any behavior that discriminates against another individual or group of individuals.
  • Communicate respectfully, respecting everyone’s right to hold differing opinions.
  • Maintain appropriate relationships with patients, teachers, staff, peers, and residents.
  • Demonstrate care and compassion for others.
  • Seek to constructively approach conflict resolution with others.

Professionalism Concern Process

When anyone (faculty, staff, residents, etc.) identifies a lapse in student professionalism, they may notify a Course Chair or Dean. The Course Chair or Dean may choose various courses of action.  They may choose to provide the student with feedback on the specific behavior, and they may also choose to formally document and report the lapse using the Professionalism Concern Reporting Form.

Professionalism Concern Reporting Form

If the lapse in professionalism falls within the parameters of the University disciplinary system (e.g. plagiarism, falsification of documents, verbal or physical or sexual assault, or sexual harassment), the student will be referred to the appropriate University Disciplinary Body.

After a Professionalism Concern Reporting Form is filed, the student will first meet with the Course Chair or their Assistant Dean to discuss the concerns, and together, they will make a plan for remediation.

Professionalism Concern Reporting Form (PDF)

The procedure following the issuance of a Professionalism Concern Reporting Form is outlined below:

If a student receives one Professionalism Concern Reporting Form:

  • The student will meet with the course chair and/or with their Assistant Dean, depending on the circumstances of the specific concern or violation. If necessary, the Chair develops a plan for remediation.
  • The form is then referred to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs and kept in the student's academic file.
  • In most cases, if no other professionalism issues occur throughout the student's medical school career, no record of the incident will be recorded in the student's permanent file.
  • The student may also be referred to the Academic Performance Committee, and/or the UCLA Office of Student Conduct.

 If a student receives a second Professionalism Concern Reporting Form

  • The student will meet with the course chair and/or with their Assistant Dean, depending on the circumstances of the specific concern or violation. If necessary, the Chair develops a plan for remediation.
  • The form is then referred to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs and kept in the student's academic file.
  • The student must meet with an Assistant Dean or Associate Dean for Student Affairs.
  • The student’s academic and professional status will be discussed at the Academic Performance Committee and their academic/professional standing may be changed. *
  • In most cases, a change in status will not be reported in the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE).
  • The student may also be referred to the UCLA Office of Student Conduct.

If a student receives a third Professionalism Concern Reporting Form: 

  • The student will meet with the course chair and/or with their Assistant Dean, depending on the circumstances of the specific concern or violation. If necessary, the Chair develops a plan for remediation.
  • The form is then referred to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs and kept in the student's academic file.
  • The student must meet with their Assistant Dean and the Associate Dean for Student Affairs.
  • The student’s academic and professional status will be discussed at the Academic Performance Committee and their academic/professional standing will likely be changed. *
  • A change in status may be reported in the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE).
  • Student may also be referred to the UCLA Office of Student Conduct.

If a student receives a fourth Professionalism Concern Reporting Form:

  • The student will meet with the course chair and/or with their Assistant Dean, depending on the circumstances of the specific concern or violation.
  • The form is then referred to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs and kept in the student's academic file.
  • The student must meet with the Associate Dean for Student Affairs.
  • The student’s academic and professional status will be discussed at the Academic Performance Committee and their academic/professional standing status will be changed.
  • A change in status will be reported in the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE).
  • Student may also be referred to the UCLA Office of Student Conduct.

If a student on Academic/Professional Probation for professionalism concerns receives an additional Professionalism Concern Reporting Form, the student may be referred to the Committee on Academic Standing, Progress and Promotion (CASPP) for consideration of dismissal. CASPP has the authority to dismiss a student from the medical school for failure to demonstrate appropriate ethical or professional behavior.

*Note that students may appeal decisions of the Academic Performance Committee (APC) to CASPP.

"The act of detachment, the virtue of method, the quality of thoroughness, and the grace of humility." 

-Sir William Osler

As a UCLA medical student, I recognize that it is a great privilege and responsibility to study medicine. When I entered this school, I undertook the task of maintaining a certain standard of conduct not only as a student, but also as a future professional.

Each student should strive to develop and maintain personal honor and integrity as well as compassionate and ethical behavior. It is the responsibility and duty of each student to achieve these ideals. Rather than an inclusive listing, the honor code outlines the behavior and ideals that we medical students believe to be important; students should strive to progress beyond these guidelines.

Academic Honesty

  • I will maintain the highest standards of academic and personal honesty.
  • I will neither give nor receive unpermitted aid in examinations or assignments
  • I will conduct research in an unbiased manner, report results truthfully, and credit ideas developed and work done by others.
  • I will uphold a classroom atmosphere conducive to learning.
  • I will not undertake any activity that will impart me with an unfair and unpermitted advantage over others.

Confidentiality

  • I will regard confidentiality as a central obligation of patient care.
  • I will limit discussions of patients to members of the health care team in settings removed from the public (e.g. not in elevators, hallways, cafeterias).

Respect for Others

  • I will treat patients and their families with respect and dignity, both in their presence and in discussions with other members of the health care team.
  • I will interact with patients in a way that respects their privacy and modesty.
  • I will interact with all members of the health care team in a considerate and cooperative manner.
  • I will not discriminate or harass nor will I tolerate discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity, pregnancy, physical or mental disability, medical condition, ancestry, marital status, age, sexual orientation, citizenship, or service in the uniformed services.
  • I will attempt to resolve conflicts in a manner that preserves the dignity of every person involved.
  • I will be truthful with patients and will report accurately historical and physical findings, test results, and other information pertinent to the care of the patient.
  • I will be sensitive to the religious and cultural beliefs of patients.

Responsibility

  • I will set patient care and well-being as the highest priorities in the clinical setting.
  • I will recognize my own limitations and will seek help when my level of experience is inadequate to handle a situation on my own.
  • I will conduct myself professionally in my demeanor, use of language and appearance in the presence of patients, in the classroom, and in the professional setting.
  • I will not use alcohol or drugs in a way that could potentially interfere with my professional responsibilities.
  • I will not use my professional position to engage in romantic or sexual relationships with patients or members of their families.
  • I will not permit access to controlled substances unless medically warranted, nor will I allow others to permit such access.
  • I will not tolerate violations of the Honor Code in others.

Integrity

  • I will endeavor to work harmoniously with my colleagues and do my share when teamwork is required.
  • As their representative, I will uphold the reputations of my school and my profession.
  • I will uphold the policies, regulations, and rules of the University, the School of Medicine, and its Hospitals.

I will endeavor to uphold these principles in both letter and spirit.

In addition to all of the DGSOM Policies, the UCLA Student Conduct Code also applies to all students enrolled in DGSOM.

UCLA Student Conduct Code

Onboarding and Compliance

As members of the medical profession, there will be numerous compliance requirements throughout your career. The information below is for compliance requirements that pertain to you during your medical education at DGSOM. It is the expectation that all students will meet established deadlines for compliance and onboarding requirements. Lapses in compliance may result in changes to a student’s Academic/Professional Standing, may lead to the inability to be enrolled in coursework at DGSOM, and could affect access to UCLA student accounts.

Many of our affiliated hospitals have additional requirements on top of the compliance requirements for UCLA and UCLA Health. This information is for medical students participating in rotations at the facilities below. Should you have any questions, contact DGSOM Compliance at compliance@mednet.ucla.edu.

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

The Student Elective Coordinator will contact medical students with scheduled rotations at Cedars with instructions to complete the onboarding requirements.

Students interested in clinical shadowing at Cedars-Sinai need to identify and obtain preliminary approval from the Cedars-Sinai faculty they wish to shadow. Once they have secured an opportunity, they will need to contact Academic Human Resources at (310) 423-7888 for a list of requirements, which must be submitted at least four weeks prior to their desired start date. Student shadowing opportunities will not exceed five consecutive days. Please contact the Medical Student Affairs Office at Cedars-Sinai for more information.

LA County DHS Facilities (Harbor, Mid Valley, MLK, and Olive View)

There are four steps to complete the on-boarding requirements for LA County DHS Facilities. The County's department coordinator will contact students prior to the start of the visit/rotation with guidance on completing these items.

  1. Live Scan (fingerprinting) Clearance
  2. EHS Online Application
  3. Health Clearance (E2 Form)
    • First-time rotating at LA County DHS or if it's been more than one year: Complete the Pre-placement E2 form (PDF)
    • Returning to LA County DHS within one year: Complete the Annual renewal E2 form
    • Note: if you sign the form yourself, you must provide your immunization records and proof of mask fitting
  4. ORCHID Training

Please see the site-specific packets for additional information, maps, required signatures, and FAQs:

Veterans Affairs

There are four steps to complete the on-boarding requirements for Veterans Affairs. Contact DGSOM compliance for more information.

  1. Complete On-boarding Packet (email compliance@mednet.ucla.edu for paperwork)
  2. Live Scan (fingerprinting) Clearance
  3. ID Badging
  4. CPRS Access

For more information on the on-boarding requirements for affiliated sites not listed above, contact DGSOM Compliance at compliance@mednet.ucla.edu.

DGSOM participates in the national criminal background check service recommended by the AAMC. This is to ascertain the ability of accepted applicants to eventually become licensed physicians in the future, enhance the safety and well-being of patients, and ensure the public’s continuing trust in the medical profession.

Additionally, background checks will also be required as an onboarding requirement at some of our affiliated hospitals.

Health insurance is a mandatory condition of enrollment for all UCLA registered students.

UC Student Health Insurance Plan (UCSHIP)

The UCSHIP fee is billed each term along with other UCLA fees. The UCSHIP is a comprehensive major medical insurance plan, providing medical, prescription, counseling, vision, and dental services.

Students with UCSHIP are expected to seek all non-emergency care at the Ashe Center and they can be referred as needed to other network providers.  For more information on UCSHIP, visit the Student Health Insurance Plan website.

Waiving SHIP

Students that have comparable local health insurance are eligible to waive UCSHIP. If you are interested in waiving UCSHIP, be sure to first look at the Ashe Center Waiving UCSHIP information for step-by-step instructions. Once you have determined that you are eligible to waive UCSHIP, you can fill out the waiver online.

BruinCare

BruinCare is a program that gives students who have waived UCSHIP prepaid access to certain core services at the Ashe Center. By purchasing BruinCare, students get access to these services:

  • All Ashe Primary Care Provider and Specialist visits
  • Core Laboratory tests
  • Core X-rays not requiring specialized equipment

Please note: BruinCare is NOT a health insurance policy.

See below for additional information: 

Medical students enrolled at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA have Long Term Disability Insurance Coverage.  For more information regarding coverage, please view the links below:

All medical students are issued a UCLA Health Bruincard. Please note that medical student badges are printed without any previous degrees included. Badges must be worn at all times on campus and in all clinical settings.

Card Issues

  • If your UCLA BruinCard is not working, please be sure to check your BruinBill to make sure your fees are paid.  An outstanding balance will prevent you from having access to University buildings and services.
  • If you are experiencing issues with Proximity Card Access in UCLA Medical Centers or Geffen Hall, contact Prox Card Access with your name, title, UID#, Prox#, Expected Graduation Date, and access you are requesting.
  • If you are experiencing issues with access to CHS or the outer doors to the LRC, contact DGSOM Building Operations with your name, title, UID#, Prox#, and Expected Graduation Date.
  • If you are experiencing issues with access to the Biomedical Library or the Graduate Reading Room, contact Daniel Contreras with your name, title, UID#, Prox#, and Expected Graduation Date.
  • If you are experiencing issues with access to Linen Services and Scrub Machines in UCLA Medical Centers, contact Materials Management or your clerkship coordinator for assistance.
  • Access to the Wooden Center and other Recreation Facilities should be automatic when your fees have been paid. If your card is not working in one of these locations, contact the Student Affairs Office for further assistance. 
  • If you have lost your ID card, contact DGSOM Compliance so that a form can be prepared for you. You will need to take the form to the Cashier’s Office in Ronald Reagan and pay the $23.50, and then take the receipt to the Photo ID Office, B8-153 Semel.  Their hours are 8:30am-11:30am and 1:00pm-4:00pm on Monday through Thursday, and only 8:30am-11:30am on Fridays.

DGSOM requires that all incoming students obtain health clearance from the UCLA Arthur Ashe Student Health & Wellness Center for personal protection and community health reasons. The health clearance requirements can be found on the Ashe Center's website.

Medical Student Requirements

In addition, all students must be monitored for tuberculosis annually during all years. A TB blood test (T-spot or QuantiFERON) is required. If the result is positive, proof of a negative chest x-ray is required.

Students are also expected to receive the seasonal influenza vaccine as this is a requirement for our clinical sites. 

Respiratory fit testing is an annual requirement. DGSOM coordinates free sessions each year; students that miss these sessions or deviate from the standard four-year MD curriculum may be responsible for arranging their own RFT to maintain compliance.  Fitting must be completed using one of the following: PAPR, N95 Kimberly-Clark or N95 Halyard.

Basic Life Support (BLS)

All medical students complete BLS for Healthcare Providers as MS1s and then again during Transition to Clerkships. Students that deviate from the standard four-year MD curriculum, including all leaves of absence, are responsible for arranging their own BLS re-certification to maintain compliance. BLS certification must be licensed through the American Heart Association.

Boundaries Training

The online Boundaries Training in Cornerstone must be completed within six months of matriculation and at least biannually thereafter. For questions related to accessing and confirming completion of the training, please submit an HR Systems Inquiry via the Employee Experience Center.

CareConnect Training and Access

In order to access CareConnect, UCLA's electronic health record, you must complete the eLearning course ELMS380. Instructions to complete the eLearning course are sent to medical students at the start of their first year. 

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) Training

The following two courses must be completed on Worksafe

  • Bloodborne Pathogens
  • Laboratory Safety Fundamentals

The initial trainings must be completed prior to matriculation. Thereafter, the refresher trainings must be completed annually.

Initial Trainings

  • Bloodborne Pathogens Online Training 
  • Laboratory Safety Fundamentals

Refresher Trainings

  • Bloodborne Pathogens Online Refresher Training 
  • Laboratory Safety Fundamentals Refresher

UCLA Health - HIPAA Training

All medical students must complete the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy and Security Workforce Training annually.  This training is a mandatory requirement in order to have an active Mednet email. 

To obtain a copy of your completion certificate, visit the Certificate Reprint page and enter your UID# in the box next to "HIPAA Privacy and Information Security Training".

UCLA Title IX Training 

UCLA is obligated under law and policy to provide our graduate and professional school students with sexual violence prevention education. Title IX prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex under any federally funded education program. In addition, the University of California’s Interim Policy on Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment (August 14, 2020, Interim Policy) requires each UC campus to provide mandatory annual training and education about Prohibited Conduct and how such conduct can be reported, to all students, faculty, other academic appointees, and staff per applicable state and federal law, and University policies.

For additional details about the annual online and virtual live training requirements, please visit the Title IX Compliance Training for Graduate Students.

DGSOM medical students must also complete the following trainings found on the DGSOM Medical Student Training page. 

  • Infection Prevention & Antimicrobial Stewardship Physician Training
  • MD-CICARE Training
  • Mobile Device Attestation
  • Radiation Safety - General Education

To obtain a copy of your completion certificate, visit the Certificate Reprint page and enter your UID# in the appropriate box.

The University Communication and Photograph Waiver is signed upon matriculation by medical students to grant permission for use of name, image and statements.

University Communication and Photograph Waiver

Registration Policies

Students must be either registered and enrolled or on an official leave of absence every term until their degrees are awarded.

  • Medical student enrollment status is always classified as full-time; the School of Medicine does not offer part-time status.
  • Term fees (semester or summer session) are flat amounts assessed to all full-time students based on enrollment status (undergraduate, graduate, professional) and program, not on enrolled units. Costs for housing, books, materials, etc. are not included.
  • Enrollment is contingent upon payment of registration fees; courses may not be attended without the payment of registration fees.
  • Going on leave of absence or withdrawing may carry financial aid implications. To learn more, please contact the DGSOM Financial Aid and Scholarships.
  • Minimum Enrollment Required for the 4-Year MD Program
    • Students in the legacy curriculum must be enrolled in a minimum of 8 semesters (typically 4 fall and 4 spring) and 1 summer term between Year 2 and Year 3.
    • Students in the HEALS curriculum must be enrolled in a minimum of 8 semesters (typically 4 fall and 4 spring semesters) and 3 summer terms (at the end of Years 1, 2 and 3).

Enrollment/Degree Verification

To access your enrollment verification letters and unofficial transcripts, please go to MyDGSOM Student Portal.

If students are completing courses; using faculty time, library facilities, laboratories, or other University resources; or receiving University funds, they are required to register in the final term in which they expect to receive their degree.

FERPA

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 sets forth requirements regarding the privacy of student education records. FERPA governs the release of these records maintained by an educational institution and access to these records.

Students have three primary rights under FERPA:

  • The right to inspect and review education records within 45 days of the day the institution receives a request for access.
  • The right to seek an amendment to their education records if the students believe them to be inaccurate or misleading.
  • The right to have some control over the disclosure of information from those educational records.

UCLA sets clear guidelines regarding the disclosure of information from student records. For detailed information, please see UCLA Policy 220: Disclosure of Information from Student Records.

The Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) also addresses access to and disclosure of student records in Standards 11.5 and 11.6 which can be viewed on the LCME Standards, Publications and Notification Forms.

DGSOM FERPA Policy

It is the purpose of this policy to provide reasonable interpretations of the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act and to protect the student's right to privacy as guaranteed therein. This DGSOM policy is designed to ensure that student educational records are available only to faculty and administration who are permitted to review them in accordance with FERPA, and accessible to DGSOM students and their designees as stipulated below.

  • Students may request in writing for themselves or any other individual(s) to be granted access to their student records. Access is provided by extracting and securely transmitting the requested records. Access is not granted directly to the system of record.
  • The student educational records at DGSOM are comprised of the following:
    • Student enrollment status and course schedules
    • Grades
    • Academic/Professional Standing
    • Summative Student Performance Evaluations  

Individual evaluations are collected solely for the purpose of informing the creation of the final, composite evaluation for each clerkship. The final composite evaluation is the basis for final grades on the clerkship, and it is the evaluation that is considered part of the educational record under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Access to individual evaluations for clinical rotations is not provided.

  • Educational Data Staff within the Education Technology Services unit of DGIT have access to medical student records for the purpose of building and maintaining data systems and reporting.
  • Access to student data within digital systems is role-based and assigned based upon the specific educational role of the faculty or staff on a “need to know” basis.
  • Faculty and Administrative Access to DGSOM’s Student Information System (SIS)
  • Only medical school leaders (i.e. deans) and medical education administration with a legitimate educational interest in the student record are granted access to DGSOM’s SIS.
  • Medical education staff are granted access to SIS on a case-by-case basis. The Director of Student Affairs must sign off on all access.
  • All system users must complete FERPA training prior to being granted access.
  • Students do not have direct access to the student information system but per FERPA they may request access to their student records at any time from the DGSOM Registrar using the Current Student Document Request Form (PDF)
  •  Faculty and Administrative Access to Evaluations of Student Performance
    • Medical education leaders and staff, including deans, medical education staff, course directors and course coordinators with legitimate educational interest in the student assessment data are granted access to the School of Medicine’s online evaluation systems.
    • Additional faculty leaders, i.e. co-directors, site directors, with legitimate educational interest in student assessment data are granted access to the online evaluation system by the course director.
    • Access to assessment data specific to a course or clerkship is reviewed and renewed annually by the course directors.
    • Teaching evaluators have access to records of the student assessment data submitted by them until they no longer have access to the evaluation systems based on the end of their specific teaching responsibilities. 
  • Access to student clinical skills and simulation assessment data is determined by the Faculty of record and/or course coordinator for a given assessment activity and is provided for a limited time for student review. Faculty of record and/or course coordinator accounts are managed by the Curricular Affairs and Simulation Center staff and access is limited to data for a given assessment activity.
  • “Legitimate Educational Interest" means: (1) the information or record is relevant and necessary to the accomplishment of some task or determination; and (2) the task or determination is an employment responsibility for the inquirer or is a properly assigned subject matter for the inquirer. University officials with a "legitimate educational interest" may include:
    • A person employed by the University or an affiliated site in an administrative, supervisory, academic research, teaching, or support staff position;
    • A person serving on a University governing body;
    • A contractor, consultant, volunteer or other party to whom the University has outsourced institutional services or functions provided that the outside party performs an institutional service or function for which the University would otherwise use employees; the outside party is under the direct control of the University with respect to the use and maintenance of Student Records; and the outside party may not disclose the information to any other party without the Student’s consent, and may not use the information for any purpose other than the purpose for which the Disclosure was made;
    • A student serving on an official committee, such as disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another University Official in performing their tasks.

Approved by Clarence H. Braddock, III, M.D., MPH, MACP, Vice Dean for Education, July 2019

Leave of Absence

An approved Leave of Absence (LOA) is defined as an approved absence from the curriculum of more than six consecutive weeks.  Students on an approved Leave of Absence for any reasons other than an Academic Leave of Absence do not pay registration fees, are not permitted to enroll in medical school coursework, and will not receive credit for any completed coursework.

The maximum period for most approved Leaves of Absence is one academic year, which may be extended for one additional academic year upon review on an individual basis by the Committee on Academic Standing, Progress, and Promotion (CASPP).  If the student is not ready to return after two years, the student may be administratively withdrawn from DGSOM by CASPP.  

The student requesting a Leave of Absence must provide the reasons for the leave and a plan to return in writing to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs, who will then present the request to CASPP.  CASPP is responsible for reviewing and determining whether to approve a student's request for a Leave of Absence. 

A Leave of Absence may be for academic, medical, personal, and/or administrative reasons:

Academic Leave of Absence

An approved Academic Leave of Absence is generated by the student, and provides students with the necessary time to complete an academic pursuit and is not subject to the two-year maximum leave interval as indicated above.  Examples of an approved Academic Leave of Absence include but are not limited to:

  • Participating in the Ph.D. phase of the UCLA-Caltech Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). Students participating in the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) will require an approved Academic Leave of Absencegreater than two years in order to complete the requirements of the MSTP program, and are not subject to the two-year maximum leave interval as indicated above.
  • Pursuit of an additional degree, such as MBA, MPH, MPP, Ph.D., either at UCLA or another institution.
  • Research, including working with a research mentor at UCLA or another institution, or participating in a formal research program (such as the Medical Research Scholars Program at the NIH).
  • Global Health Fellowships (such as GloCal and SAPHIR Fellowships). 

Medical Leave of Absence

An approved Medical Leave of Absence may be generated by the student, by the Dean's Office, or the institution and must be accompanied by documentation from the student's health care provider and/or an independent evaluator must attest to the student's inability to participate in the curriculum due to a medical condition.

Personal Leave of Absence

An approved Personal Leave of Absence is generated by the student in order to attend to family, economic, or other personal factors that affect the student’s ability to participate in the curriculum, or to pursue an opportunity outside of medicine.  Examples of reasons for a Personal Leave of Absence include but are not limited to:

  • Loss of a loved one or family member.
  • Need to care for a loved one or family member.
  • Any personal situation preventing participation in the curriculum.
  • An extracurricular opportunity such as employment.

Administrative Leave of Absence

An Administrative Leave of Absence may be generated by several institutional entities including an Academic Performance Committee (APC), the Committee on Academic Standing, Progress, and Promotion (CASPP), Associate Dean for Student Affairs; and the Dean's Office. Examples of reasons for an Administrative Leave of Absence include but are not limited to: 

  • Noncompliance with health clearance or other compliance requirements.
  • Nonpayment of registration fees.
  • Violations of the DGSOM Honor Code, UCLA Student Conduct Code, DGSOM's Non-Academic Technical Standards. 
  • Remediation plans as determined by the identified APC and/or CASPP.
  • Not meeting deadline requirements for USMLE Step 1 and/or Step 2.
  • Students experiencing academic and/or professional difficulty.       

Leave of Absence Forms

After meeting with your advisors and school administration, please complete the appropriate Leave of Absence Request Form that you can find on the DGSOM Forms page.  

Returning from Leave of Absence

With the exception of students participating in MSTP, the maximum period for an approved Leave of Absence is one academic year, which may be extended for one additional academic year upon review on an individual basis by the Committee on Academic Standing, Progress, and Promotion (CASPP).  If the student is not ready to return after two years of an approved LOA, the student may elect to withdraw from DGSOM, the student may petition CASPP for an extension of their LOA, or based on individual circumstances may be dismissed from DGSOM by CASPP.  

Reinstatement from an Approved Academic Leave of Absence 

  • Students intending to return to the DGSOM curriculum from an approved Academic Leave of Absence must complete and submit the required forms to the Registrar by January of the year in which they plan to return to the curriculum (i.e., students returning in summer or fall semesters must submit the required paperwork no later than the previous January).

  • Note that failure to follow the Leave of Absence guidelines and procedures outlined by the DGSOM Registrar may result in the student's administrative withdrawal from DGSOM by CASPP.

Reinstatement from an Approved Medical Leave of Absence 

  • When students are ready to return from an approved Medical Leave of Absence, they must submit clearance to return from their health care provider and/or an independent evaluator attesting to their ability to resume their studies and participate fully in the curriculum.  
  • Students intending to return to the DGSOM curriculum from an approved Medical Leave of Absence must complete and submit the required forms to the Registrar no later than three (3) months prior to their return to the curriculum.
  • Note that failure to follow the Leave of Absence guidelines and procedures outlined by the DGSOM Registrar may result in the student's dismissal from DGSOM by CASPP.
  • CASPP will determine whether the student is eligible to return to medical school, based on the student’s previous academic/professional performance and medical documentation. 

Reinstatement from an Approved Personal Leave of Absence 

  • Students intending to return to the DGSOM curriculum from an approved Personal Leave of Absence must complete and submit the required forms to the Registrar by January of the year in which they plan to return (i.e., students returning in summer or fall semesters must submit the required paperwork no later than the previous January).
  • Note that failure to follow the Leave of Absence guidelines and procedures outlined by the DGSOM Registrar may result in the student's administrative withdrawal from DGSOM by CASPP.

Reinstatement from an Administrative Leave of Absence 

  • Students intending to return from an Administrative Leave of Absence must first be approved by the Committee on Academic Standing, Progress, and Promotion (CASPP).  A student's return from an approved Administrative Leave of Absence must be in accordance with prior remediation plans, if available, as developed by the Academic Performance Committee and/or CASPP.
  • Students intending to return to the DGSOM curriculum from an Administrative Leave of Absence must complete and submit the required forms to the Registrar by January of the year in which they plan to return (i.e., students returning in summer or fall semesters must submit the required paperwork no later than the previous January).
  • Note that failure to follow the Leave of Absence guidelines and procedures outlined by the DGSOM Registrar may result in the student's dismissal from DGSOM by CASPP.

FAQ

For comprehensive information shared in the form of Frequently Asked Questions, to provide as much support and information for students considering a leave of absence, those currently on a leave of absence, and those preparing to return to the medical school curriculum.

Leave of Absence FAQ (PDF)

Research Policies

In addition to the required weeks of clinical electives, students may receive up to 6 weeks of non-clinical credit to count towards degree requirements. One type of non-clinical elective is a Research Elective.

To sign up for a research elective, follow the instructions on the Research Opportunities site.

Research Opportunities

The Office of Research Policy and Compliance (RPC) provides leadership in shaping, interpreting and implementing UC and UCLA research-related policies, procedures and guidance. The office operates under the direction of the Assistant Vice Chancellor – Research, and reports to the Vice Chancellor for Research. RPC serves as the administrative home of the Conflict of Interest Review Committee (CIRC). In addition to convening this faculty peer review committee, RPC engages in consultations and other outreach activities relating to conflicts of interest and conflict of commitment regulations, policies and procedures. These interactions include guidance about entrepreneurial activities and proposed engagement with industry.

UCLA Conflict of Interest

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